Archive for February, 2011

27
Feb
11

Three Bad-Ass Poets Reading

Poets shouldn’t jingle jangle jingle. They should be tough like cowboys.

No. Tougher than that.

They should be rough as sandpaper and tough as nails. They should be:

Three Bad-Ass Poets Reading Poster

Who are these Bad-Ass Poets?

The Doc (Charles Coté) is the author of the chapbook Flying for the Window (Finishing Line Press, 2008) and is working on a full-length book of persona poems called Shrink, which is  about a man in search of himself amidst the patients he tries to help. Publication credits include: Upstreet, Salamander, The Cortland Review, Redactions, Free Lunch, Identity Theory, Blueline, Modern Haiku, Connecticut River Review, and HazMat Review. He is a psychotherapist in private practice and teaches poetry at Writers & Books in Rochester, NY.

The Babe (Sarah Freligh) is the author of Sort of Gone (WordTech Communications, 2008), a book of poems that follows the rise and fall of a fictional pitcher named Al Stepansky. Her work has been featured on Garrison Keillor’s Writer’s Almanac and in the upcoming anthology Good Poems: American Places. Among her awards are a 2009 poetry fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, a poetry grant from the Constance Saltonstall Foundation in 2006, and a grant from the New York State Council for the Arts in 1997. Sarah was born and raised in Michigan, and she currently teaches at St. John Fisher College in Rochester, New York.

The Wino (Tom Holmes) is the editor of Redactions: Poetry & Poetics (www.redactions.com). He is also author of After Malagueña (FootHills Publishing, 2005), Negative Time (Pudding House, 2007), Pre-Dew Poems (FootHills Publishing, 2008), Henri, Sophie, & the Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex (BlazeVOX Books, 2009), The Oldest Stone in the World (Amsterdam Press, 2011), and Poetry Assignments: The Book (Sage Hill Press, forthcoming 2011). He has thrice been nominated for the Pushcart Prize. His work has appeared on Verse Daily and has also appeared in Blue Earth Review, Chiron Review, Crab Creek Review, The Delmarva Review, The G. W. Review, Mississippi Review, Mid-American Review, New Delta Review, New Zoo Poetry Review, Orange Coast Review, Rockhurst Review, San Pedro River Review, Santa Clara Review, South Carolina Review, Sugar House Review, Swarthmore Review, and many other journals that don’t have “Review” in their name. He also maintains this blog and makes posters.

For more information about A Different Path Gallery and their other events, visit their website: http://www.differentpathgallery.com/.

To download the poster as a PDF, click Three Bad-Ass Poets Reading Poster PDF.//

23
Feb
11

Today’s Favorite Blogs, or How I Love Oxford … and Words … and Reverend Walter W. Skeat

Today I found three blogs I liked, no, loved right away. I loved them so much, I added a new blog roll category, Language Roll. (Look. It’s over there on the right. Scroll down a bit.)

@OxfordWords suddenly appeared on my Twitter feed (@TheLineBreak). The link led me to this article: Monthly Gleanings: February 2011. Oh, it was love at first syllable. The first parts of the blog entry were about split infinitives and verb agreement. Upon reading I was like, “Oh man, these are like the conversations I have in my head, but now they are coming from this guy’s head.”

Anatoly Liberman

Anatoly Liberman

Then. Then. Real joy. He started talking about etymologies and my favorite etymologist, Reverend Walter Skeat.

Reverend Walter W. Skeat

Reverend Walter W. Skeat

Liberman then wrote another thought I’ve had:

I never miss the chance of expressing my admiration for Skeat, and I am sorry that no one has published a full-length biography of this great man.

Right on, brother Liberman! Word!

(By the way, I once created a school of poetry based on Skeats. I called it Skeatsism. Also, James Joyce’s favorite book was? . . .  That’s right – Skeats’s An Etymological Dictionary of the English Language. I don’t know what edition this is in the preceding link to Amazon. Oh believe me. It matters. You can tell which edition Joyce was using in Ulysses because of his underlying etymological meanings and puns. I think Joyce had the second edition. I have the third, which corrects, among other things, the etymology for cancer (a clue to Joyce using the second edition), and then there is a fourth edition, which is probably the one on Amazon in the link. I love mine. My parents got it for me for a gift. I don’t know how they found it in the early 90s before the Internet, but thanks Ma and Pa. It’s a life-changing book. My copy is just a black hardcover book. 8.5″ x 11″ with a now broken spine and pages clinging to that spine for dear life. It even has some Indo-European roots in the back. This reminds me of the American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language (third and fourth editions). It has good etymologies and a great Indo-European dictionary in the back. More love. Swoon. (By the way, the link is to another version of the fourth edition. My looks different, and I got mine way before 2006, which is the listed release date. I like how in the “S” section, the word on the recto page header is “sincere”, and below is picture of O. J. Simpson.

O. J. Simpson

Sincere

Just a funny accident of language and layout, at least in my fourth edition.))

Back to the blogs.

Then I scrolled down to learn who was writing this article, which you now know is Anatoly Liberman. There was a brief bio, which I immediately respected. There was also one link I clicked: The Oxford Etymologist.

Are you kidding?! A blog about etymology and updated every Wednesday. My heart was a flutter.

Then I clicked around and found the Oxford University Press’s blog.

OUPblog

It’s a warehouse of blogs, including: Current Events, Economics, History, Leisure, Literature, Reference, Religion, and Science. If it wasn’t for football, I wouldn’t need any other website.

So there are two blogs: The Oxford Etymologist and the Oxford University Press’s blog. And then I think #OxfordWords also tweeted a link to this post: Between you and me. I hate when people say, “Between you and I.” Dude! Objective case, please. Thank you.

Then I clicked the Better Writing link near the top on the left. Holy cow, Batman. Stuff about grammar, spelling, punctuation, and practical writing. I nearly fainted.

My love has been adequately expressed. I hope you enjoy these blogs, too.//

17
Feb
11

in pursuit of the juiciest wine: day eighty-six (Domaine de Fontsainte Corbieres 2007)

Domaine de Fontsainte Corbières 2007Tonight’s wine is a Kermit Lynch wine – Domaine de Fontsainte Corbières 2007. I went looking to see what made up this red, and it’s like a backward Cotes du Rhone from the other night’s Domain Les Grands Bois Côtes Du Rhone Cuvee Les Trois Sœurs 2009. This red is made from three old-vine grapes: 60% Carignane (pronounced karen yawn), 30% Grenache, and 10% Syrah. I got that break down from The Cab Franco Files. This site also has more useful information.

First this description:

This is unapologetically a lighter-bodied wine showing fresh red fruit character and minerality. Perhaps this has to do with the wine undergoing carbonic maceration, where the fermentation actually takes place inside the grape. Regardless, there’s lively acidity and a seam of tannin, but essentially just enough structure to lend a bit of gravitas. The bouquet is a bit funky, and eventually shows more barnyardy aromas than fruit aromas. But that’s just fine. This is a straightforward wine that’s easy to drink or pair with food.

And then this funky graphic representation of the wine.

Domaine de Fontsainte Corbières 2007 Graphic Representation

Oh, and cool. He just tried it the other day, too. I feel a connection with this blog already. I might have to add it to the list on the right-hand side over here ====>.

That’s done. Now to the wine.

It smells sweet. It smells like a Fingers Lake wine. I’m not getting the funkiness that Cab Franco File, well not much anyway. I’m picking up a sweet red berry.

Well, good. (Adverb, adjective.) It tastes better than expected, and the body is bigger than expected. It doesn’t taste like a Fingers Lake wine, either. Though Cab Franco File is right. It’s is “straightforward.” It might be a hair to sweet me, but not really. It will good with some spicy food.

I keep thinking of strawberries and a bright red color after I put down the glass.

This wine has just flipped on me. After giving it to my girlfriend, who gets earthiness and mushrooms, I’m now getting a more funky nose and sweeter and more sour finish.

It’s like it magically opened up one hour and fifty-five minutes after popping the cork.

Are we all drinking the same wine?

I don’t think I care for this wine much anymore. It’s ok, but I can immediately think of 24 better wines for the same $12 price or less. Also, I don’t think I’m a fan of “carbonic maceration.” I wanted to be, but I’m not.

Oh, Kermit Lynch, it must not be easy being a wine merchant.

I say 87 points. No more, and maybe less.

You know?! If you don’t smell and suck in more air than wine, then it’s not that bad.//

15
Feb
11

Redactions Issue 13 Review

Today New Pages released a review of Redactions: Poetry & Poetics issue 13.

New Pages

Redactions Issue 13 CoverNew Pages is a very informative website that is concerned with literature, especially presses and journals. Each month or so they write reviews of a few selected literary journals. They are always reviewing something or posting news about something literary. Today they reviewed the poetry journal I edit, Redactions.

At one point they say:

If you’re looking for smart new poems, you’ll know you’re there when you pick up this issue of Redactions.

They also mention some of the poets in the issue, such as David Wagoner, J.P. Dancing Bear, Gerry LaFemina, Jeanine Hall Gailey, Walter Bargen, Michael Schmeltzer, Nathan McClain, Kathryn Nuernberger, Linda Cooper, and Lucille Lang Day.

The review also says this about the journal:

There is nothing crass or excessively edgy, though poems here tend toward the acerbic and emotionally cautious; and there is nothing overtly sentimental or impossibly innocent.

I’ve often heard similar things said about me. So I guess the journal is a reflection of me and my tastes. I was seriously unaware of this. I thought I was broad, open, and eclectic. It’s especially odd because I had Sarah Freligh as the guest editor. I don’t think I’d say those things about her.

Still, it’s good to hear good things about something you are dedicated to.

Much thanks go to all those who contributed to the issue:

Natalie Young, Lindsey Wallace, David Wagoner, Jerry VanIeperen, Elizabeth Twiddy, Jeff Tigchelaar, Kory M. Shrum, Michael Schmeltzer, Rebecca Givens Rolland, Mark Rice, Barbara Price, Kathryn Nuernberger, Michelle Menting, Michael McLane, Nathan McClain, Robin Linn, Gerry LaFemina, Veronica Kornberg, Nazan Koksal, Liz Kay, Christopher Howell, Gail Hosking, Sean Patrick Hill, Melanie Graham, Jeannine Hall Gailey, Chris Dollard, Jeff Dodd, Lucille Lang Day, J. P. Danicng Bear, Star Coulbrooke, Charlie Coté, Linda Cooper, Walter Bargen, guest editor Sarah Freligh, and Brian Warner for the cover art.

You can read about all of them here: http://redactions.com/contributor-bios.asp under Issue 13.

You can read the whole review of Redactions: Poetry & Poetics issue 13 here: New Pages review of Redactions issue 13.//

14
Feb
11

in pursuit of the juiciest wine: day eighty-five (Domain Les Grands Bois Côtes Du Rhone 2009)

BAM

Windshield inside

and BAM

Windshield outside

That’s what happens when a pickup driver with NY state license plate RN 2xx (I won’t reveal the real license plate number. That might be uncool.) doesn’t clean out the inside of their pickup and a sheet of ice as big as my windshield flies through the air at 40 mph and crashes into my windshield. Oddly, the driver was going 15 mph below the speed limit, but as soon as that thing hit my car, she sped off. I tried to catch her and accelerated to 60 and honked my horn for a mile behind her. (Yes, I know the owner’s name.) But she didn’t want to have anything to do with it. So, my safety senses came to me and I pulled over. Anyway, that was Saturday afternoon. Today it’s Monday, and I worked from home because I have no car to drive. Thanks RN 2xx.

In the meanwhile, it’s time for Domain Les Grands Bois Côtes Du Rhone Cuvee Les Trois Sœurs 2009. What makes a Cotes du Rhone a Cotes du Rhone? It has to come from the Rhone region in France. And cuvee means “vat” or “tank,” but it has come to mean blend. And I guess in this case, Les Trois Sœurs, it’s a blend of three sisters.

Twisted Sister

But not a blend of Twisted Sisters. Oi.

Domain Les Grands Bois Côtes Du Rhone Cuvee Les Trois Sœurs 2009So what’s in this cuvee? Since it’s from the Rhone region, it will probably have Syrah, and if it’s from the Southern Rhone region it will probably have Grenache and maybe some Syrah and/or Mouverdre. A little research tells me this is 60% Grenache, 30% Syrah, and 10% Carignan (pronounced karen yawn). A little more research tells me this winery is in the Southern Rhone region near the towns of Cairanne and Rasteau.

Southern Rhone Valley

Cairanne and Rasteau are in the middle. Click the map to see it bigger.

(For more information, http://www.terroir-france.com/wine/cdr_map_south.htm.)

I think it’s wine drinking time.

First words out of my mouth were, “Oh, this smells f***ing good.” It’s deep, as deep as its dark ruby color. It smells juicy and fruity. There are some flowers, too. It smells well blended.

I picked up burning wood on the nose right as I took a sip. I thought of Northern Idaho in the winter. Specifically, Sandpoint, Idaho.

The Bridge to Sand Point, Idaho

The Bridge to Sand Point, Idaho. Click the image to see it bigger.

But I usually think of the town with all the great restaurants and bars with great beers and food.

For a small town, it has so much good food. In fact, you won’t Stay Hungry in Sandpoint.

The wine is bit drier than I expected, but yummy with dark berries and dark fruits. I also get some earthiness. And it finishes with some dark chocolate, bitterness, and chalkiness.

Oh, what a fun wine this is, and it’s only $15 at Mahan’s.

Actually, this is pretty big for a Rhone. I like it. It will go good with chicken in garlic sauce.

So I’m going to say 89 points and really pushing 90 for this one. Good stuff.//




The Cave (Winner of The Bitter Oleander Press Library of Poetry Book Award for 2013.)

The Cave

Poems for an Empty Church

Poems for an Empty Church

The Oldest Stone in the World

The Oldest Stone in the Wolrd

Henri, Sophie, & The Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex

Henri, Sophie, & The Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex

Pre-Dew Poems

Pre-Dew Poems

Negative Time

Negative Time

After Malagueña

After Malagueña

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