Archive for the 'Random' Category

06
Apr
14

Tree Signs Along the Longleaf Trace

From about mile 1.5 to mile 3 of The Longleaf Trace, there’s a stretch where signs appear indicating various trees along The Longleaf Trace. I took a picture of each sign for curiosity, future nostalgia, and for a series of poems I’m working on. I assume there are more trees, such as the bamboo and lilac trees I have spotted but that are not marked. (I’m not good with identifying trees, but I can identify those two.) If you know of more trees along the Trace, please leave a comment thanks.

The order of these pictures are in the order as I encountered them. I walked west for the first part, so I took a picture of the tree signs on my right-hand sign, or towards the north. Then I turned around and walked east, and took pictures on my right-hand side, again, but this time to the south. The last of the north signs is, I think, “Sweetgum,” which is right at the 5K marker.

Chinese Tallow Tree

Chinese Tallow Tree

Blackgum

Blackgum

Yaupon

Yaupon

 

Sparkleberry

Sparkleberry

Post Oak

Post Oak

Shortleaf Pine

Shortleaf Pine

Sassafras

Sassafras

Tulip Poplar

Tulip Poplar

Loblolly Pine

Loblolly Pine

Longleaf Pine

Longleaf Pine

Eastern Dogwood

Eastern Dogwood

Beautyberry

Beautyberry

Elliott's Blueberry

Elliott’s Blueberry

Southern Magnolia

Southern Magnolia

Sweetgum

Sweetgum

Blackjack Oak

Blackjack Oak

Supplejack

Supplejack

Crabapple

Crabapple

Crabapple and Supplejack

Crabapple and Supplejack

Groundsel Tree

Groundsel Tree

Wax Myrtle

Wax Myrtle

Hornbeam

Hornbeam

//

The Longleaf Trace, if you don’t know, was once a railroad track, but it has been converted into a long walking and biking path. It begins at The University of Southern Mississippi campus and goes west 40.2 miles until it ends in Prentiss, Mississippi. More officially:

This is South Mississippi’s premier running, biking, hiking, equestrian trail. It is a beautiful linear park,  41 miles long and fairly flat (a rails-to-trails conversion), extending  from Hattiesburg (elevation 220′) through Sumrall (290′), Bassfield (460′), and Carson to Prentiss (336′). The trail is 10 feet wide and paved with asphalt. It has been extended to the USM campus, and negotiations are underway to acquire the right of way to downtown Hattiesburg. And can you imagine the impact of someday extending it from Prentiss to Natchez, thus connecting it to the Natchez Trace and Mississippi River Trails? (www.longleaftrace.org)

//

May 11, 2014 (Mother’s Day): I walked another mile or so along the Longleaf Trace to Jackson Road, where there’s a rest stop, too. There is also this sign, with the unfortunate typo:

Trail Identification Longleaf Trace 2008

Trail Identification Longleaf Trace 2008

There’s also another half dozen or so other trees that are labeled in the extra mile stretch. Hopefully, I’ll add them to this collection. I doubt however I’ll extend the long poem I wrote, which has a section for each tree, plus a couple others.//

25
Jul
13

Evil Penguin Lookout: The Movie

Those of you who follow me on Facebook know that since the beginning of the year or the end of 2012, and especially this summer of 2013, I post three or four times a week a picture from Longleaf Trace where it bridges over Highway 59 in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. Most of the pictures look something like this:

Highway 59

It’s just something I do on my 5K or 10K walks on the Longleaf Trace. The Longleaf Trace, if you don’t know, was once a railroad track, but it has been converted into a long walking and biking path. It begins at The University of Southern Mississippi campus and goes west 40.2 miles until it ends in Prentiss, Mississippi. More officially:

This is South Mississippi’s premier running, biking, hiking, equestrian trail. It is a beautiful linear park,  41 miles long and fairly flat (a rails-to-trails conversion), extending  from Hattiesburg (elevation 220′) through Sumrall (290′), Bassfield (460′), and Carson to Prentiss (336′). The trail is 10 feet wide and paved with asphalt. It has been extended to the USM campus, and negotiations are underway to acquire the right of way to downtown Hattiesburg. And can you imagine the impact of someday extending it from Prentiss to Natchez, thus connecting it to the Natchez Trace and Mississippi River Trails? (www.longleaftrace.org)

One night (January 4, 2013) on one of these walks, I took a picture at night.

Evil Penguin Lookout

Then the following commentary occurred:

Evil Penguin Lookout Origins_blackout

Through time it became Evil Penguin Lookout or sometimes Scary Penguin Lookout. I prefer the former but the latter is an equally acceptable name.

Today on my walk, I decided to film Evil Penguin Lookout instead of taking a picture. That way everyone can see what it looks like. I was going to provide more commentary, but there was a dude walking on the bridge and I was too self-conscious to talk too much, especially since I felt weird enough filming the bridge. So here’s Evil Penguin Lookout: The Movie, with a twist ending.

//

01
Jan
13

The Line Break 2012 in Review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

4,329 films were submitted to the 2012 Cannes Film Festival. This blog had 40,372 views in 2012. If each view were a film, this blog would power 9 Film Festivals

Click here to see the complete report.

13
Aug
12

Holmes’ Hattiesburg Hideaway

There ain’t much to this post. It’s just a short video of my new apartment so my family can see what happening. Non-family members can also watch.

This video has been updated. It’s the same video, but the video and audio are now aligned and the video quality is better.

Updated 8-21-12.//

21
Jul
12

Paintings from the 1990s

I have wanted to scan these water color paintings for quite some time before the color faded even more. I finally did it, though the colors faded. I’ve tried to touch up the color in a few paintings. These are are all water colors on 8.5″ x 11.7″ paper. You can click each image to see it bigger, and I would suggest doing that, too.

//

The Beginning of Time
The Beginning of Time. Circa 1997.

I painted this based on an experience I once had in 1989, where for a moment, the briefest moment I’ve experienced, I could see the beginning of time. I think this picture is of some time before inflation or before 10^-42 seconds. The following day I performed a similar meditation, but that time I experienced the breadth of the universe. I reached out my hand as far as I could into infinity and then I scratched the back of head, which scared the hell out of me and immediately woke me from my meditation.

//

Bison, My Bison

Slain Bison. Circa 1997-99.

This is my attempt at Paleolithic cave art. I had to photoshop in the arrow because it was barely visible. It had faded over time. Below is supposed to be a puddle of blood with a stream of it in the lower right of the puddle. And there is also an udder in the bison’s belly. The spear enters from the top of the bison which is parallel to the stiffened tail. The spear exits the bison in the belly at the black gash mark. The arrow is bloody red. This image is really sexual on a Jungian level.

//

The Mouth of Language
The Mouth of Language. Circa 1997.

The colors have faded here. The tongue should be redder. This painting could also be titled “Double Vagina Dentata.”

//

Rose 1

//

Rose 2
//

Rose 3
The Rose Triptych. Circa 1995.

This a series about the life and death of a rose or possible states of a rose. This was highly symbolic on a personal level and very Jungian, but not as Jungian as the vagina dentata or the slain bison. I think the triptych speaks for itself.

//

16
Feb
12

Why You Should Purchase Copies of Your Poetry Book From Your Publisher

If your book gets published, it is a good idea to purchase copies of your own book. Yes, you will get some free author copies, but those aren’t really enough. Besides, you should also get a generous author’s discount on purchases of your book. So  why you should purchase copies of your poetry book from your publisher? Here’s a short list in no particular order:

  1. You should support your publisher. This is done for a few reasons. One to help them recoup costs so they can print other poets. Besides, they have faith in your book, so give a little back for that faith. Plus, the publisher might remember this when your next book is looking for a publisher. But the reason is more of the former.
  2. You will want to have copies to sell at your readings. This is where you will really make your money. You will get an author discount when you purchase your copies. That discount should be at around 50%. When you sell them at retail price, you will make double your money back, which at the time will be enough to buy a good dinner, a good bottle of wine, or some one else’s collection of poems.
  3. You can sell copies to an independent book store on consignment and make some money. You won’t make as much as at a reading, but you will make some. The general consignment rule is 60/40. If your book is retailed at $10, the bookstore should give you $6 for every sale. (You will have to come back at some later time to collect the money.)
  4. You will want to  have copies to swap with other poets. This will happen a lot, and it’s a good way to start, establish, or continue a friendship with a fellow poet. Giving is always good, and swapping is even better.
  5. You will also want to have copies to give to some one you like or appreciate or to give to a poet you admire. Maybe you will meet someone and have a good time with them. A good end to that good time is to give them a copy of your book, but only if it comes up in conversation that you have a book. (You shouldn’t just randomly give them a book. That’s awkward.) You will also want to give copies to those teachers you admire or who stimulated you or supported you. I do. It feels so good. I think those teachers appreciate it, too, since they get to see something for all the time they put in. They will be happy. And most important, you will want to send copies to those poets who you admire and that shaped and affected your poetry. W. S. Merwin and William Heyen have copies of all my books. (Also, you can give a copy to someone you want to impress. Like someone you are attracted to and want to win over.)
  6. You will want to have copies to give to family members. Sure the family should be supportive and purchase copies, but, hey, it’s your family. They love you. They support your enough already. Give them a copy. (The same holds true for close friends.)
  7. Your publisher may or may not send out review copies of your book. If they do, there may be some places you can think of that they did not. Perhaps there is a journal you frequently appear in. They might want to see a copy of your book. Since they published you a lot, they must like your poetry. Thus, they are a good place to hope for a review. Or maybe you know a reviewer, so you should send them a copy. Really, you just want to get your book out there. You want as many people to read your book as you can. Your poems want to change and/or save lives.
  8. This following reason is probably the most important  reason: You will want to have copies to sell after the publisher is sold out. Most likely there will only be one print run, so get as many copies as you can to last you for the rest of your life because the book will most likely never be printed again. In other words – HOARD. You’ll thank me for this when your seventy and you want to give a copy of your first book to someone who you currently don’t even know exists.

Here’s some additional advice. If you win a contest, use at least half the prize money to purchase copies for all the reasons above. Plus, at this rate, they are free because you’ve got all this new, unexpected money.

Basically, it comes to down to supporting and sharing. And when your older, it will come down to sentimentality. Your children might want copies. And if you are successful, so will some biographer. But, basically, you will want to hold the book in your hands. If you are like me, you will want all of your books on display at your funeral. At my funeral, I’ll have all my books on display and each issue of Redactions on display. It will be my opus. People will be able to see what I created and left behind.

No one is too big for this advice.//

17
Jan
12

Happy 70th Birthday Muhammad Ali – A Tribute in Songs

Here are some tribute songs for The Greatest on his 70th.

Sir Mark Rice – Muhammad Ali

Trio Madjesi – 8ieme Round

Jorge Ben – Cassius Marcellus Clay

The People’s Choice – Best Ever & Muhammad Ali

Eddie Curtis – The Louisville Lip

Dennis Alcapone – Cassius Clay & Joe Frazier (Round 2)

Dermot Kelly – Muhammad Ali – The Ballad

The Alcoves – The Ballad of Muhammad Ali

Orchestra G.O. Malembo – Foreman Ali Welcome To Kinshasa

Big Youth – Foreman vs. Frazier

Don Convay – Rumble in the Jungle

Tom Russell – Rumble in the Jungle

Rope-a-Dope

The Quotes

David Jordan – “My Destiny” – A Tribute

Much of this can be found on Hits & Misses.//




The Cave (Winner of The Bitter Oleander Press Library of Poetry Book Award for 2013.)

The Cave

Poems for an Empty Church

Poems for an Empty Church

The Oldest Stone in the World

The Oldest Stone in the Wolrd

Henri, Sophie, & The Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex

Henri, Sophie, & The Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex

Pre-Dew Poems

Pre-Dew Poems

Negative Time

Negative Time

After Malagueña

After Malagueña

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