Posts Tagged ‘A Different Path Gallery



26
Apr
11

in pursuit of the juiciest wine: day ninety-one (Signargues Côtes du Rhônes Villages Granacha 2007)

Man, the poetry world is busy lately. I’ve been running the Just Poets blog updating it with all the local poetry events and posting a poem day for National Poetry Month. I’ve been laying out and doing the cover for Michael Meyerhofer‘s Pure Elysium, which won the Palettes & Quills 2010 chapbook contest as judged by Dorianne Laux. (Her latest collection, The Book of Men, is wonderful. Look for a review here soon.) Here’s the Pure Elysium cover:

Pure Elysium full cover

I’m also just about to start editing issue 14 of Redactions: Poetry & Poetics – the I-90 Poetry Manifesto issue with guest editor Sean Thomas Dougherty. (There’s a good interview with him at Bookslut.) Then I have an anthology to layout and do the cover for. Plus, I gotta work my full-time job, too. Oh, and I’m planning the last reading of the season for the A Different Path Gallery Reading Series. You can read about the last reading of the season here.

Man, do I need a drink.

Tonight, I’m going to have Signargues Côtes du Rhônes Villages Granacha 2007. A Granacha from the Rhone valley. Robert Parker at the Wine Advocate gave it 91 points. So it will probably be a big, fruity wine with lots of alcohol. Bonus – It’s an old vine wine. Sweet.

I’ve been dying to drink this for about two weeks, so here it goes.

It shimmers in ruby like thick stained glass windows that have never been clean and the sun is setting so its low angles of sunlight barely light it and create the hint of a glow.

The nose is pleasant with some bright berries, dark raspberries, and flowers. And there’s a hint of duck.

My first sip is Yum and It will go good with cheese. I pictured a yellowy orange cheese. (Grammar rule: don’t hyphenate compound modifiers if the word ends with a y.)

When I taste the Granacha, I pick up the duck again. I also get some big, dark berries. The finish is a bit spicy, too. This wine is almost meaty, too. I feel like I can almost eat it. Or maybe I just want to. Oh, to eat a wine. That would be divine. (Or should I say, devine. Ha.)

The body doesn’t give much. It’s like it wants to let loose and be juicy, but it’s being anal about something. Maybe it needs more time to open, though it’s been over an hour. Maybe it needs a decanter. Maybe it needs tomorrow. Don’t we all need tomorrow. As long as tomorrow arrives with me, all is good.

I don’t have much else to say about this wine. I hope I didn’t pay more than $15 for it.

. . .

So I’ve been swirling the glass around for the last half hour, and it’s opening. The berries are definitely brighter. There’s less dank.

The DankMoe: Oh, everybody is going to family restaurants these days, tsk. Seems nobody wants to hang out in a dank pit no more.
Carl: You ain’t thinking of getting rid of the dank, are you, Moe?
Moe: Ehh, maybe I am.
Carl: Oh, but Moe: the dank. The dank!

I like less dank, and this wine is slowly getting better. It’s lively and almost jammy. A thin jammy.

It’s such a different wine in the last half hour.

I’m digging it.

I’m giving it an A-. I love it.//

20
Apr
11

A Different Path Gallery Reading Series: May 2011

On Saturday, May 21 at 7:30 p.m. at A Different Path Gallery (27 Market St., Brockport, NY), John Roche and Kitty Jospé will read their poetry.

Roche Jospé Poetry Reading Poster

Kitty Jospé – Teacher with a passion for languages and the arts. Music and poetry both require a precision in elements of craft applied to the endless possibilities of personality.  This line from her poem, “Rumbled in the Street,” sums up her ars poetica: “I want to land a helicopter – stop the massacre of what it means to be human.” Her book, Cadences, will be available. Proceeds go to Women Helping Girls.

John Roche  earned his PhD from SUNY Buffalo, studying with Robert Creeley and John C. Clarke. His first two full-length poetry collections are Topicalities (2008) and On Conesus (2005), both from FootHills Publishing. His latest book of poems, Road Ghosts, is available from theenk Books. He also edited the collection Uncensored Songs for Sam Abrams (Spuyten Duyvil, 2008), co-edited with Patricia Roth Schwartz an anthology of poetry by inmates at Auburn Prison called Doing Time to Cleanse My Mind (FootHills, 2009), and edited Martha Rittenhouse Treichler’s Black Mountain to Crooked Lake: Poems 1948-2010, with a Memoir of Black Mountain College (FootHills, 2010). Roche is an Associate Professor of English at RIT.

To download a printable post, click Roche Jospé Poetry Reading Poster PDF.

Schedule it on your Facebook calendar by clicking here.//

27
Mar
11

Footage from the Three Bad-Ass Poets Reading

The night started with a buzz, and then we got drunker.

Well, that’s not completely true, but there was definitely some drinking. It was actually one of the funnest readings I have ever been to. And it definitely was BAD-ASS.

The night of March 26th began as a party at A Different Path Gallery with the wonderful curator Katherine Weston. The party was then interrupted by some poetry for an hour and then party continued.

The poetry reading began with Charles Coté, author of Flying for the Window.

One of the first poems he read was called “April.”

During his reading, Charlie was caught texting.

Charlie then closed his read with the concluding poem from his book Flying for the Window, “After a Storm.”

Charlie was followed by Sarah Freligh, author of Sort of Gone.

Sarah Freligh reading

Of course, before she read there was a brief intermission so everyone (about 20+ of us) could refill their wine glasses. One of the first poems Sarah read was “Birthday,” I think, or “Happy Birthday.”

A bit later she read “Halfway House.”

Then there was another intermission to fill more wine glasses. Then I (Tom Holmes) read. The first part of what I was read was from my recently released collection of poems, The Oldest Stone in the World (Amsterdam Press, 12:00:01, 1-1-11). I gave a brief introduction to the book.

Tom Holmes Gesticulating

Then I commenced with the first part of my reading. (In case you’re curious, we all read about 15-20 minutes.) I devoted the first part of my reading to the book, and the second part to some of new investigative poems of Paleolithic cave art. But first excerpts from The Oldest Stone in the World.

Then some of the new poems: “Paleolithic Person Discovers Fear,” “Paleolithic Possession,” “The First Painting,” “The Invention of the Ellipsis,” “Paleolithic Person Tells of the Invention of Harmony and Melody,” and “Paleolithic Person Learns to Sing.”

Then we returned to the party where the poets words, along with the audience’s words, slowly became more and more slurred. Luckily there was a limo to drive most people home, and the rest of us walked home.

It really was a bad-ass reading by poets and attendees. Thank you everyone for coming.//

29
Jan
11

The World’s Deadliest Readers . . . Coming Soon

Movie’s shouldn’t be the only medium with a trailer. A reading with three wonderful writers should also have a trailer.

Alright, so the reading doesn’t have a budget for its own trailer since it was all spent on wine and tapas for the reading. But imagine if those guys gave a reading, then you’ll know what this reading will be about.

That’s right. Steve Fellner, Tony Leuzzi, and Lindsey Brown will be giving a reading on Saturday, February, 26th at 7:30 p.m. at A Different Path Gallery on 27 Market Street in Brockport, NY.

The Writer Within poster
(To see a larger version of the poster, click the poster. To download a printable PDF, click The Writer Within poster PDF.)

Tony Leuzzi is a poet who teaches literature and composition at Monroe Community College. He is also the author of two books of poems: Tongue-Tied and Singing (FootHills Publishing, 2004) and Radiant Losses (New Sins Press, 2010). His prose and poetry has also appeared in a wide range of journals, such as Arts and Letters, Pinyon, Rhino, Left Curve, and The Kenyon Review.  He is currently completing a book of interviews with American poets and is mid-way through his third book of verse.

Lindsey Brown has studied fiction writing with Pinckney Benedict and Michael Knight at Hollins University and interned at Francis Ford Coppola’s literary magazine Zoetrope: All-Story. She completed her Bachelors degree in Spanish from SUNY Brockport in 2008 and earned her Masters in English at Brockport in 2010. Her work is forthcoming in the anthology, Love Rise Up. Certified in bilingual elementary education, Lindsey now teaches Spanish to seventh, eighth, and ninth graders at Allendale Columbia, an independent day school in Pittsford, NY.

Steve Fellner’s first book of poems Blind Date with Cavafy (Marsh Hawk Press, 2007) won the Thom Gunn Gay Male Poetry Award. His memoir, All Screwed Up (Benu Press, 2008), focuses on his relationship with his ex-trampoline champion mother.//

09
Nov
10

The I-90 Poetry Revolution Reading – The Beginning. The Manifestation.

This is my 100th post, so it should be a good one. I hope that it is. I’m going to post some movies and pictures from my reading with Sean Thomas Dougherty from Friday, October 22, 2010, at A Different Path Gallery in Brockport, NY, when the I-90 Poetry Revolution took physical, oral, and aural form.

The reading began with me reading the I-90 Manifesto. (The first few words, “Like the highway which we live on, we embrace the,” were not recorded. The whole manifesto is here: https://thelinebreak.wordpress.com/2010/09/06/i-90-manifesto/. And special thanks to my girlfriend, Melissa, for taking the pictures and the movies.

Then Sean read. Here he is in action.

Sean Thomas Dougherty with Striking Urgency

Sean Thomas Dougherty with Striking Urgency

Sean Thomas Dougherty up Close and Personal

Sean Thomas Dougherty up Close and Personal

Sean Thomas Dougherty with the Audience

Sean Thomas Dougherty with the Audience

And here he is in action reading “There Is No Idea Here.”

Then I read what is probably the first I-90 Poem, Muriel Rukeyser’s “The Road.”

And here are few images of me reading.

Tom Holmes Reading

Tom Holmes Reading

Tom Holmes Reading a Long Poem

Tom Holmes Reading a Long Poem

Tom Holmes Suddenly Reading in the Dark

Tom Holmes Suddenly Reading in the Dark

And here I am reading for the first time ever “Paleolithic Person Explains Why He Paints Deep in the Cave.”

And that was, in part, the manifestation of the I-90 Poetry Revolution.

Long live the I-90 Poetry Revolution!//




The Cave (Winner of The Bitter Oleander Press Library of Poetry Book Award for 2013.)

The Cave

Poems for an Empty Church

Poems for an Empty Church

The Oldest Stone in the World

The Oldest Stone in the Wolrd

Henri, Sophie, & The Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex

Henri, Sophie, & The Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex

Pre-Dew Poems

Pre-Dew Poems

Negative Time

Negative Time

After Malagueña

After Malagueña

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