Posts Tagged ‘Amsterdam Press

11
May
11

My June 14th Poetry Reading with Adam A. Wilcox

Happy 30th Anniversary, Writers & Books!!!

Put together a poet/foodie and a poet/oenophile, and what do you get?
A banquet of tastes, textures, and sensory delights for the literary palate.

The Genesee Reading Series, with impresario Wanda Schubmehl, continues to celebrate the 30th Anniversary of Writers & Books with a program featuring Tom Holmes and Adam A. Wilcox.

Tom HolmesTom Holmes (that’s me) is the editor of Redactions: Poetry & Poetics. He is also author of After Malagueña (FootHills Publishing, 2005), Negative Time (Pudding House Publications, 2007), Pre-Dew Poems (FootHills Publishing, 2008), Henri, Sophie, & the Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex (BlazeVOX Books, 2009), The Oldest Stone in the World (Amsterdam Press, 2011), and Poetry Assignments: The Book (Sage Hill Press, forthcoming). He has been nominated three times for the Pushcart Prize. His work has appeared on Verse Daily and has also appeared in Blue Earth Review, Chiron Review, Crab Creek Review, The Delmarva Review, The G. W. Review, Mississippi Review, Mid-American Review, New Delta Review, New Zoo Poetry Review, Orange Coast Review, Rockhurst Review, San Pedro River Review, Santa Clara Review, South Carolina Review, Sugar House Review, Swarthmore Review, and many other journals that don’t have “Review” in their name. His current poetry book reviews and writing about wine and poetry can be found at his blog, The Line Break: https://thelinebreak.wordpress.com/, which is right here!

Adam A. WilcoxAdam A. Wilcox is President and founder of Writ Wilcox, an information design company. Before that, he was a radio producer, curriculum developer, manager of technical documentation, and instructional designer for e-learning, and also ran an entrepreneurial custom-courseware business.

His poetry has appeared in Poetry, The Colorado Review, Cairn, and Folio, among other journals. For eight years, he wrote the “Gut Instincts” food column for Rochester City Newspaper, and currently writes for and edits RochesterFoodNet.com.

He also plays bass for The Dan Eaton Band and leads the Saturday Service Band at First Unitarian Church of Rochester. He lives in Rochester, NY, with his choreographer wife, Anne Harris Wilcox, their three home-schooled children, and their Bernese mountain dog.

The Genesee Reading Series will be held at Writers & Books, located at 740 University Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607, on Tuesday, June 14, 2011, at 7:30 pm. Admission is $3 for members and $6 for the general public.

Download the PDF flier for more information: Holmes Wilcox Genesee Reading Series 6-14-11.

Mark it on you Facebook calendar here: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=172684909454121.//

27
Mar
11

Footage from the Three Bad-Ass Poets Reading

The night started with a buzz, and then we got drunker.

Well, that’s not completely true, but there was definitely some drinking. It was actually one of the funnest readings I have ever been to. And it definitely was BAD-ASS.

The night of March 26th began as a party at A Different Path Gallery with the wonderful curator Katherine Weston. The party was then interrupted by some poetry for an hour and then party continued.

The poetry reading began with Charles Coté, author of Flying for the Window.

One of the first poems he read was called “April.”

During his reading, Charlie was caught texting.

Charlie then closed his read with the concluding poem from his book Flying for the Window, “After a Storm.”

Charlie was followed by Sarah Freligh, author of Sort of Gone.

Sarah Freligh reading

Of course, before she read there was a brief intermission so everyone (about 20+ of us) could refill their wine glasses. One of the first poems Sarah read was “Birthday,” I think, or “Happy Birthday.”

A bit later she read “Halfway House.”

Then there was another intermission to fill more wine glasses. Then I (Tom Holmes) read. The first part of what I was read was from my recently released collection of poems, The Oldest Stone in the World (Amsterdam Press, 12:00:01, 1-1-11). I gave a brief introduction to the book.

Tom Holmes Gesticulating

Then I commenced with the first part of my reading. (In case you’re curious, we all read about 15-20 minutes.) I devoted the first part of my reading to the book, and the second part to some of new investigative poems of Paleolithic cave art. But first excerpts from The Oldest Stone in the World.

Then some of the new poems: “Paleolithic Person Discovers Fear,” “Paleolithic Possession,” “The First Painting,” “The Invention of the Ellipsis,” “Paleolithic Person Tells of the Invention of Harmony and Melody,” and “Paleolithic Person Learns to Sing.”

Then we returned to the party where the poets words, along with the audience’s words, slowly became more and more slurred. Luckily there was a limo to drive most people home, and the rest of us walked home.

It really was a bad-ass reading by poets and attendees. Thank you everyone for coming.//

27
Feb
11

Three Bad-Ass Poets Reading

Poets shouldn’t jingle jangle jingle. They should be tough like cowboys.

No. Tougher than that.

They should be rough as sandpaper and tough as nails. They should be:

Three Bad-Ass Poets Reading Poster

Who are these Bad-Ass Poets?

The Doc (Charles Coté) is the author of the chapbook Flying for the Window (Finishing Line Press, 2008) and is working on a full-length book of persona poems called Shrink, which is  about a man in search of himself amidst the patients he tries to help. Publication credits include: Upstreet, Salamander, The Cortland Review, Redactions, Free Lunch, Identity Theory, Blueline, Modern Haiku, Connecticut River Review, and HazMat Review. He is a psychotherapist in private practice and teaches poetry at Writers & Books in Rochester, NY.

The Babe (Sarah Freligh) is the author of Sort of Gone (WordTech Communications, 2008), a book of poems that follows the rise and fall of a fictional pitcher named Al Stepansky. Her work has been featured on Garrison Keillor’s Writer’s Almanac and in the upcoming anthology Good Poems: American Places. Among her awards are a 2009 poetry fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, a poetry grant from the Constance Saltonstall Foundation in 2006, and a grant from the New York State Council for the Arts in 1997. Sarah was born and raised in Michigan, and she currently teaches at St. John Fisher College in Rochester, New York.

The Wino (Tom Holmes) is the editor of Redactions: Poetry & Poetics (www.redactions.com). He is also author of After Malagueña (FootHills Publishing, 2005), Negative Time (Pudding House, 2007), Pre-Dew Poems (FootHills Publishing, 2008), Henri, Sophie, & the Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex (BlazeVOX Books, 2009), The Oldest Stone in the World (Amsterdam Press, 2011), and Poetry Assignments: The Book (Sage Hill Press, forthcoming 2011). He has thrice been nominated for the Pushcart Prize. His work has appeared on Verse Daily and has also appeared in Blue Earth Review, Chiron Review, Crab Creek Review, The Delmarva Review, The G. W. Review, Mississippi Review, Mid-American Review, New Delta Review, New Zoo Poetry Review, Orange Coast Review, Rockhurst Review, San Pedro River Review, Santa Clara Review, South Carolina Review, Sugar House Review, Swarthmore Review, and many other journals that don’t have “Review” in their name. He also maintains this blog and makes posters.

For more information about A Different Path Gallery and their other events, visit their website: http://www.differentpathgallery.com/.

To download the poster as a PDF, click Three Bad-Ass Poets Reading Poster PDF.//

20
Jan
11

Two-and-a-half pigs out of three recommend The Oldest Stone in the World

That’s right. In a recent survey of the Three Little Pigs, two-and-a-half of them said they recommend The Oldest Stone in the World (Amsterdam Press) to future home builders.

The First Little PiggieThe First Little Piggie said:

I built my second house out of copies of Holmes’s newest book. The book is solid. The Big Bad Wolf, he huffed and he puffed, but he couldn’t blow down the house that Holmes built.

The Second Little PiggieThe Second Little Piggie said of The Oldest Stone in the World:

I too built my second home from Holmes’ newest collection of poems. The poems are so strong that the Big Bad Wolf gave up on his huffin’ and puffin’ and just started reading the book. He read it over and over. He was blown away.

The Third Little PiggieThe Third Little Piggie said:

If I hadn’t already built my house of bricks, I surely would have used Holmes’ book.

It has a solid foundation. It’s a force that can’t be reckoned with.

So there you have it. Two-and-a-half out of three pigs enjoy Tom Holmes’ The Oldest Stone in the World.

The Big Bad WolfWhen asked to comment, the Big Bad Wolf said:

It changed my ways. It made me reconsider my own existence. My own wolfhood. Because of Holmes’ poems, I will be a better wolf to all pigs throughout the world.

Two-and-a-half pigs and one wolf can’t be wrong. Order your copy of The Oldest Stone in the World today. Order now. Order here.//

01
Jan
11

The Oldest Stone in the World

The Oldest Stone in the World by Tom Holmes and released by Amsterdam Press on 1-1-11 is the first book release of 2011.

The Oldest Stone in the World

Tom Holmes wrote this book almost 11 years ago. It was his bridge from his heady, intellectual poems into the poems of everyday speech, images, and much closer to humanity. In this collection, you can see the blossoming of Holmes’ imagination while maintaining a loose grip on formalism.

Wanda Schubmehl says of the book:

Tom Holmes has given us a Stone for the ages, a physical metaphor for the tension between our anxiety about death and our fierce compulsion to live fully. The language is simple, but the electric effect of its surprising associations and vision propels us into vast new landscapes of possibility. Almost Jungian in its effect, the work vibrates with mystery and significance, and readers will find that the Stone has a tendency to speak quietly to them long after the book is put away.

Steve Fellner says:

What a tremendously generous gift! Written about ten years ago, Tom Holmes shares some of his vital early work. Imagine a collection with a literary conceit rivaling Louise Gluck’s in The Wild Iris and with the influence of Donald Revell’s more spare lyrics. By reading Holmes’ past work, I can’t imagine what the future will bring. All I know is this: I can’t wait to read it.

Here’s the introduction to the collection of poems:

The Oldest Stone in the World came out of an experiment to write a poem at the rate of one word per day. Because of this slow pace, I believed I would be able to meditate upon that word all day & explore rhythms & undertones that could attach to & build from the word-of-the-day. In addition, I would also use the word-of-the-day in another poem. Thus, each day I would write a word, which contributed to a slowly developing poem, & I would write a completely different poem that included the word-of-the-day. The experiment ceased after 30days. In practice, the experiment did not work as well as anticipated. However, there was a nineteen-day run of poems that resulted in this book.

I first learned of the stone in Guy Davenport’s essay “Olson” in his book The Geography of the Imagination. I then researched & read what I could find that was written in English of the stone. The most helpfulplace was Rev. T. Dempsey’s The Delphic Oracle. Though he had good information, he didn’t have much information. Thus, I was left to fragments of information & my imagination & meditations.

This stone, however, actually exists. According to Davenport’s essay,“Olson,” “In September 1913, the French archaeologist FrançoisCourby unearthed this ‘omphalos’ at Delphi.” In addition, Plutarch has written about it, but I have failed to find that writing translated into English.

Nonetheless, I give you The Oldest Stone in the World.

This is Tom Holmes’ fifth collection of poems.

This beautifully handmade book from Cindy Kelly and all the good people at Amsterdam Press is currently available for sale at Etsy. To get your copy, click here. Soon it will be available at Amazon, too. But Etsy is a cool place to get it. It’s like going to the local book store.

It will also soon be available at the wonderful Lift Bridge Books in Brockport.

The cover art is a drawing by Guy Davenport, which appears in the “Olson” essay. The image is reproduced with the permission of the Guy Davenport Estate.

The book is dedicated to Charles Olson, Guy Davenport, and Pat Meanor.

Charles Olson the great poet, Guy Davenport the wonderful essayist, and Pat Meanor the professor from SUNY Oneonta who first brought my full attention to poetry.

Enjoy the read!!//

31
Dec
10

in pursuit of the juiciest wine: day seventy-six (Geyser Peak Walking Tree Cabernet Sauvignon 2005)

Geyser Peak Block Collection Walking Tree Cabernet Sauvignon 2005It’s about three-and-a-half hours until my fifth collection of poems, The Oldest Stone in the World, is released from Amsterdam Press. While I wait, I’ll be drinking the Geyser Peak Block Collection Walking Tree Cabernet Sauvignon 2005, which last night when I opened it was horrible. I mean, the nose was good and it tasted pretty good on the palate, but the finish, ug, it destroyed everything. This seems odd to me because the last time I had this I thought it was damned good. Sometimes a wine is better the next day, and that’s what I’m hoping for. Wines are never good the third day. Yuck.

The nose is still good. It’s big and dark with dark currants and some cherries. On the palate it’s pleasant, but the finish is still tart, but better than yesterday. It’s also dry on the finish, which is fine. I think you have to acclimate yourself to this wine because the tartness is going away with each sip.

The palate has cassis or anise, too, which is probably what is exploding on the finish.

I think this might be a bad bottle. I liked it before. Also, because I was wondering if other people liked it, I did some research, and other people liked it, too. The Wine Enthusiast gave it 91 points.

I think this is a bad bottle, especially when you consider the other reviews and my previous review here.

Perhaps it’s time to open another bottle.

Happy new year to all of you!//

30
Dec
10

in pursuit of the juiciest wine: day seventy-five (Monte Antico Toscana 2006)

The new years is almost here, and so is my newest collection of poems, The Oldest Stone in the World (Amsterdam Press). With a release date of 1-1-11, it will be the first book of the year. But that’s not what I want to write about. No.

Jimi Hendrix Newport 1969

Jimi Hendrix Newport 1969

I want to write about two things: Jimi Hendrix and Monte Antico Toscana 2006. I’ve been listening to Jimi again. I always knew he was good, but now I think I’m getting him. No, it’s not like an intellectual getting when you talk through your nose and say something like, “Mm, yez. I certainly do dig this fella’s music. Yez, bravo, young chap. Quite good. Quite good, indeed.” I’m actually just feeling him. His music feels good. I don’t think he’s playing the guitar. I think he’s just making sounds that sound good to him and everyone. I’m listening to him live in Newport June 22, 1969 – the first part of the All Star Jam. He’s exploring the songs he already made masterpieces. He’s making them new. What else can you expect from an artist. But there’s more than all of that. It’s his presence or the presence that surrounds him. There’s an ease around. A peacefulness and a playfulness. It’s a bit similar to joy. I could on, but I won’t get any closer to describing what I’m saying. Needless, Jimi is awesome, and I have always underrated him, and I had always rated him high.

Monte Antico Toscana 2006I have similar feelings about Monte Antico. I’ve been underrating this wonderful wine. I’ve always liked it. Always being less than a month. Since December 3. Even in the Ruffino Modus Toscana 2007 vs. Monte Antico Toscana 2006 battle, I knew it was good, but I underrated it. In fact, since that Toscana battle, where the Modus won, it’s not the Modus that I’ve been returning to. Nope. I’ve been returning to the Monte Antico Toscana 2006. And I’ve been returning to it often. Part of that, a minor part, is the $10 Mahan’s sales price. Man, this is an amazing wine for $10.

In the last words of “We Gotta Live Together – Feels So Good,” Jimi sings:

Let me drink that wine. Feel it. Feel it in my bones, baby. I feel so good.

He knows what’s up. He’s talking to me from the beyond.

I love the jammy nose of the Monte Antico Toscana 2006, on the palate it has heavenly, juicy fruits, berries, and plums, and it finishes with caramel. It’s bright and alive. The Monte Antico Toscana 2006 pairs well with many foods.

As Jimi says at the beginning of the 1970 Randall’s Island concert:

You know the same old rap. Forget about yesterday and forget about tomorrow. We’re just gonna have fun tonight, right? Let’s just get it on tonight.

I think that sums up the Jimi Hendrix presence for me and what I’m going to do tonight with this wine.//




The Cave (Winner of The Bitter Oleander Press Library of Poetry Book Award for 2013.)

The Cave

Poems for an Empty Church

Poems for an Empty Church

The Oldest Stone in the World

The Oldest Stone in the Wolrd

Henri, Sophie, & The Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex

Henri, Sophie, & The Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex

Pre-Dew Poems

Pre-Dew Poems

Negative Time

Negative Time

After Malagueña

After Malagueña

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