Posts Tagged ‘Brian Warner

02
Nov
16

Poetry Assignments: The Book (Online): New School; or Double Vision; or WWI (Writing While Intoxicated) & Its Repercussions

POETRY ASSIGNMENTS

Brian Warner's The Cave

“The Cave” by Brian Warner. Used with the permission of Brain Warner.

or 100 Jackhammers for the Poet with Writer’s Block;

or 100 Ways to Jumpstart the Engine;

or 100 Pencil Exercises;

or 100 Ways to Stimulate Your Next Wine, Cheese, & Poetry Night

//

Table of Contents

Introduction

  1. Finding the First, Discovering the Middle, & Chasing the End
  2. Imaginary Worlds
  3. Science, the Universe, Time, & Other Evolutions
  4. Fun with Letters, Words, Language, & Languages
  5. Forms: Obscure, Updated, & Invented
  6. New School; or Double Vision; or WWI (Writing While Intoxicated) & Its Repercussions
  7. Miscellany; Trying to Relate the Unrelated; or These Gotta Go Some Place . . . So Here
  8. Stupid Money, Dumb Politicians, & Celebrating America
  9. Responses; or Calling All Poets (Dead & Alive); or Talking to Eternity
  10. It’s All About You

//

New School; or Double Vision; or WWI (Writing While Intoxicated) & Its Repercussions

Verbal Cubism

Here’s a phrase that probably exists, & if it doesn’t, it should. I’m sure it’s from somewhere. Let me know if you know.

One of the aspects of cubism is using multi-perspectives in space & time on one canvas. Consider Pablo Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon.

Les Demoiselles d'Avignon. Paris, June-July 1907. Oil on canvas, 8' x 7' 8". Acquired through the Lille P. Bliss Bequest. (333.1939) Image licenced to Tom Holmes HOLMES, TOM by Tom Holmes Usage : - 3000 X 3000 pixels (Letter Size, A4) © Digital Image (c) The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by SCALA / Art Resource

Les Demoiselles d’Avignon. Paris, June-July 1907. Oil on canvas, 8′ x 7′ 8″. Acquired through the Lille P. Bliss Bequest. (333.1939)
Image licenced to Tom Holmes HOLMES, TOM by Tom Holmes
Usage : – 3000 X 3000 pixels (Letter Size, A4)
© Digital Image (c) The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by SCALA / Art Resource
Picasso, Pablo (1881-1973) © ARS NY. Les Demoiselles d’Avignon. Paris, June-July 1907. Oil on Canvas, 8’x7’8″. Acquired through the Lille P. Bliss Bequest (333.1939). The Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY, U.S.A. Digital Image © The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by SCALA / Art Resource, NY. Pablo Picasso’s “Les Demoiselles d’Avignon” © 2007 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Can we do this in poetry? Consider the following Natasha Sajé poem from her book Bend (Tupelo P, 2004):

   I See 

   the cats playing with a rose fallen
   from a wreath: a stiff silvery stem 

   topped by a dark pink ball.
   How curiously they bat the rose, 

   sniffing it with glee, and that’s what
   makes me bend, and see that it’s really 

   the long dried tail and entrails of a rat.
   I laugh: If rose & rat are not so far 

   apart, then what can’t be mistaken
   for something that it’s not? 

   The turn’s a way of telling me
   to make each breath a self-revision.


   “I see” from Bend by Natasha Sajé, published by Tupelo Press. Copyright 2004 by Natasha Saje. All rights 
   reserved. Reproduced by permission of Tupelo Press.

The assignment then: Bend as many perspectives as you can into a poem – a poem to not exceed one page in length (consider it your canvas). And please, don’t rely too heavily on line breaks.

Helpful hints to achieve this assignment: pretend you are inside Picasso’s mind or Einstein’s mind.

//

GemALEgedicht – The Pintist School of Poetry

Let me tell you a story of the forgotten school of poetry that Ralph Black & I (Tom Holmes) have recently discovered. This school arrived in the late nineteenth century & early twentieth century in a few dank, town pubs in Northern England, Scotland, & on the outskirts of Dublin, Ireland. This poetic movement wasn’t a response to anything, it grew organically from the hops & yeast in Pints of Ale.

The Pintists, as they were called, believed in writing poetry whilst drinking pints of ale. Though they preferred to call their composing of poetry in this manner as Pinting. This school of poetry held firm in their beliefs of Pinting: everything could be explained by using only objects in the bar as a metaphor for the human condition; they believed the bartender was a high priest, or priestess; and their muse, their god, was represented in the below picture painted by Brian Warner.

Brian Warner's One More Time

The painting “One More Time” by Brain Warner is from the collection of Tim and Trinity Barnosky and is used with their permission.

Yes, the Pintists held strong til they read these lines from The Waste Land:

   HURRY UP PLEASE IT’S TIME
   HURRY UP PLEASE IT’S TIME

These lines shook many Pintists to the core. They believed they had been stagnating by drinking only one ale. The Pintists slowly fractured. First came the experimentalist who started binging on the German Ales. Then some of them even split into a smaller group of fringe avant gardists who downed Indian Pale Ales whilst writing their poems (& they were sure to use “whilst” as often as possible in their poems because they believed “whilst” had etymological connections to “whistle”, which they thought keen because they were always wetting their whistle, which later became their underground, hip word for pencil, because the pencil, they believed, couldn’t create unless it was wet with ale. (Some deep-hearted, avant garde, IPA Pintists actually took this literally, & dipped their pencils into their pints of IPA, like a fountain pen into an inkwell, as a ritual before they wrote. A few years later, these poor soles, these writers in the primes of their youths & artistic expressions, died from lead poisoning. This sorrowed all Pintists, & they slowly vanished like the sputtering of an empty keg.)).

At the same time everyone was reading the lines “HURRY UP PLEASE IT’S TIME”, & whilst the avant garde IPA Pintists were slowly killing themselves, feminists got involved in the movement. They believed, & rightly so, that they too could drink as much & write as well as any of the male Pintists. This group of women would become known as the Ale-Wives. And whilst they believed in the Pintist school of poetry, they also believed the words “HURRY UP PLEASE IT’S TIME” was a good suggestion to all that it is time to go home. The Ale-Wives stressed the importance that there are certainly a few things outside of the pub that are important to consider. They also stressed the cyclic nature of life – all good things must come to an end, but tomorrow is just the beginning of more good things.

Around the time of the rise of the Ale-Wives, Ezra Pound, T. S. Eliot, & Gertrude Stein were in Dublin, Ireland, trying to raise rent money for James Joyce. They met Joyce in a bar in Dublin to give him rent money so he wouldn’t be evicted & so he could concentrate on his writing. Joyce was so touched by the love & concern that he started buying drinks to celebrate this act of love. Eventually, when the rent money was almost all gone, Joyce started buying drams of ale instead of pints. He was trying to conserve what little money he had left. At which point, Ezra asked Joyce if he had heard or read anything of the Pintists. Joyce responded, “Yes, they are so dramatic & grandiose in their expositions. What they need to do is start drinking these drams, like us!” Soon the minimalist school of Pintists was born, & they called themselves the Pintalists. The Pintalists lasted the night, & the school was never heard from again. Though one poem was recently discovered by a Pintologist from Brockport, NY. This Pintologist was in SUNY Buffalo’s library of archives doing research on Ezra Pound. Whilst going through Pound’s journals, he found a cocktail napkin with a poem on it. He believes the poem was written during the night of the Pintalists. The poem reads:

   In a Tavern in Dublin, Ireland

   The apparition of these faces –
   bubbles on a dram of ale.

Ok. Your assignment is to revive the school of Pintists. You will find a bar & compose poems whilst drinking pints of ale, um, I mean, you will involve yourself in Pinting.

Go forth.

Oh, one last thing, all Pintists believed in good tipping practices. They believed it healed the soul. They believed the better they tipped their high priests & priestesses, the less hungover they would be in the morning.

Ok. Now, go forth.

//

Katzenjammer Poesie, Jeg har tommermenn Poesi, Katza Poezja, Mamurluk Poezija, or Hangover Poetry

There’s a somewhat new & most unique book out: The Wrath of Grapes: A Complete Hangover Cookbook & Guide to the Art of Creative Suffering (XOXOX Press, 2004). In a smart & fun & creative manner, the author, Patrick Meanor, educates us in ways to deal with our hangovers. And it will be most useful for us poets, since this book is culturally aware & informs us through poems, poets, writers, movies, music, etc.

One of the things The Wrath of Grapes notes is that there is very little written about the hangover, creatively or medically. But it does note that Peter Fallow, the anti-hero from The Bonfire of the Vanities, is “the first official Hangover Hero in American literature.”

Your assignment is not to get drunk & hungover, but to be on the forefront of a new genre: Hangover Poetry. This will be a poetry that deals with the hangover on some level: as a starting point for a metaphor, a place to turn a metaphor towards, a launching point for something else – but it must include the hangover. We need to see what we can learn from the hangover? how can it inform us? etc. . . .

A sub-genre would be poems that were written while hungover, but this is not advised.

Here’s an excerpt from an early part of The Wrath of Grapes that suggests something you should not do when hungover:

Don’t study the physical habits of your pets, especially the dog. Cats are mercifully enigmatic and won’t evoke too much paranoid response from you, although their piercing stare could unnerve you if you observe too long. Dogs, however, especially their incredibly quick eyebrow movements, should be avoided. Their eyebrow activity may pull you into the emotions that they seem to be expressing and will exhaust your mind by trying to follow their quickly changing feelings from sadness-to-happiness-to-fear-to-illness-to-daffiness, and so on ad infinitum. This is called “dog’s eyes syndrome.” It’s the old problem of what poets call the “pathetic fallacy”; that is, projecting human emotions into simple animal actions that mean nothing – which is really pathetic. Their eyebrows are probably adjusting to light refraction since most dogs are half blind anyway and they’re simply trying to see you. But don’t think about that too much, either.

(Patrick Meanor quote from The Wrath of Grapes is used with permission of XOXOX Press. Please visit their website at www.xoxoxpress.com.)

//

13
Aug
12

Holmes’ Hattiesburg Hideaway

There ain’t much to this post. It’s just a short video of my new apartment so my family can see what happening. Non-family members can also watch.

This video has been updated. It’s the same video, but the video and audio are now aligned and the video quality is better.

Updated 8-21-12.//

10
Aug
11

in pursuit of the juiciest wine: day ninety-nine (Two Hands Angel’s Share Shiraz 2008)

I got this bottle of Two Hands Angel’s Share Shiraz 2008 back in April, which you can read about here, and tonight is the night I’m going to drink the Angel’s Share. What is the angel’s share, and why am I drinking it tonight? The angel’s share is the portion of wine that evaporates from the barrel during fermintation. It’s the portion of wine that goes straight to the angels. It’s for them and them only, but perhaps they save it for us, so they can drink it with us when we get to heaven.

What if the angels don’t drink
their shares at all,
but instead save them,
so that later,
when we check in,
or perhaps at judgement day,
we’ll find samples
of all the wines and all
the days, all the lost
friendships, everything
we thought had evaporated away,
lined up and displayed,
not as an appreciation
or a rebuke,
but simple a testament,
to what we tried to make
with our lives.

– Joseph Mills. “Some Questions about the Drinking Habits of Angels.” Angels, Thieves, and Winemakers. Winston-Salem, NC: Press 53, 2008.

(By the way, I’m plugging this book again. It’s fun. If you like poetry and wine, you’ll like this book. If you don’t like poetry and only like wine, you’ll like this book. If you don’t like wine, why are you here?!)

So why am I drinking it tonight? Because I wonder about these angels. I wonder about god. I wonder about the universe. But mainly because my newest collection of poems, Poems for an Empty Church (Palettes & Quills) is going to the printer in a day or two.

Poems for an Empty Church full cover

Click the cover to see it better and read some blurbs.

It’s my newest because it will the newest collection published, but my other collection, Henri, Sophie, & The Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex has newer poems.

Poems for an Empty Church was completed in 2007ish, but it began in 1989ish, maybe 1988. There’s one poem in there, “The Three Voices of Creation,” that took 17 years to write, and if you count some edits I made to it the other day, then it took 22 or 23 years to write. (You can read it here: pages 40-42.) That also may have been the first poem I read aloud to a crowd. I read it at the Autumn Cafe, a wonderful little restaurant in Oneonta. I went to the restaurant by myself. (I didn’t really know any poets then. I didn’t even really know if I was one.) I signed up. I read it. I read it well. An older couple loved it. They said they hadn’t heard anything like that in years. I was too shy and nervous to respond well. Now that I think about it, I may have only read the first section. The other two sections may not have been written yet. One version of this poem was also turned into a play. Actually, I tried on two different occasions to make it play. The second time I did it I forgot about the first time I tried to make it a play. I’m just remembering this now.

So anyway, I do freelance work for Donna M. Marbach, who runs, edits, and owns Palettes & Quills. I helped market and advertise her poetry chapbook contest with judge Dorianne Laux. I did the layout and design for Michael Meyerhofer’s Pure Elysium. And I helped with the marketing and advertising for Pure Elysium. During this whole process, I half jokingly and 80 percent seriously suggested to Donna that she should publish my book. I told her all the poems had been published in journals and I had the perfect cover art for it, Brian Warner’s “The Kiss.” (From the About the Artist section in the book:

“The Kiss” was inspired by the Tom Holmes’ poem “Death Has His Say.” The poem “There are some places you can’t find God” is, in turn, a response to the “The Kiss.”

“There are some places you can’t find God” is the concluding poem to the book.) Anyway, Donna eventually, after releasing Michael’s book and reading my book, said she would like to publish my book but I had to do the layout and design. Cool by me. I can make the book perfect and exactly like I want it. Who’s going to respect how my poems should appear on a page more than me? No one. I think I’m awesome at laying out a book of poems. When you layout a book of poems, you need a poet to do it. No one else can get it. I love layout and design, and I’m happy I got to layout my book.

So after Donna finishes editing the book, it’s good to go. There’s hardly anything to find. I’ve been working on this for years, editors at other journals have seen the poems, my girlfriend gave it a good read, I gave it another good read. In fact, when I read it again, for the first time in about two or three years since I last looked at it, I realized how tight this book is. How poems from across the book talk to each other. How ideas travel through the book, and images, too. Objectively, it’s a pretty solid book. It surprised me. I was engaged. I think you’ll like it to. When it comes out in September, I’ll let you know. It will be on sale on Amazon, Lift Bridge Books, and other book stores.

Enough of that. I could go on for quite some time about this book. Needless to say, if you believe in God or don’t believe in god, if you have a religion or need a religion, if you’re empty or spiritually full, Poems for an Empty Church will speak to you and help you experience the Other.

Two Hands Shiraz Angel's Share Shiraz 2008To the wine. This is not the one that is number two on The Wine Spectator Top 100 Wines of 2010, which I’ve had and is delicious. I suspect this won’t be as good, but that it will be good. However, the Wine Spectator gave this one 86 points, which doesn’t make this seem promising, but it better be since I spend $30 or so on it.

This is a dark, dark maroon colored wine. The nose is meaty, smoky, thick, and with mushrooms. I want to eat it. My girlfriend picks up the spices from Shake N Bake. I haven’t had Shake N Bake since the early 80s, so I don’t know what those spices are.

Wow that was weird. It was almost fizzy for a second.

It doesn’t taste as it smells or as good, but it’s big and tasty. It’s juicy on the front of the mouth and shortly after the finish. The finish is also of grapes. Like grape jam. It’s jammy.

I also pick up some chocolate and plums. And I also get hints of spice, especially on the finish.

My girlfriend picks up chicken and cranberry and says it is thick on the finish – it coats the back of the throat.

I asked my girlfriend how much she’d pay for a bottle of this, as she didn’t know the actual price, and she said, “$8. It’s not that extraordinary.” She’s right. It’s not extraordinary, but I’d pay $15 for this, but not $30 again.

This will go good with pasta, chicken, pizza, and steak and hamburgers and a peanut butter jelly sandwich.

So what do I say about this wine. I say it’s definitely an 88 or a B, but you can find better for half the cost, or hold it for a few years.//

15
Feb
11

Redactions Issue 13 Review

Today New Pages released a review of Redactions: Poetry & Poetics issue 13.

New Pages

Redactions Issue 13 CoverNew Pages is a very informative website that is concerned with literature, especially presses and journals. Each month or so they write reviews of a few selected literary journals. They are always reviewing something or posting news about something literary. Today they reviewed the poetry journal I edit, Redactions.

At one point they say:

If you’re looking for smart new poems, you’ll know you’re there when you pick up this issue of Redactions.

They also mention some of the poets in the issue, such as David Wagoner, J.P. Dancing Bear, Gerry LaFemina, Jeanine Hall Gailey, Walter Bargen, Michael Schmeltzer, Nathan McClain, Kathryn Nuernberger, Linda Cooper, and Lucille Lang Day.

The review also says this about the journal:

There is nothing crass or excessively edgy, though poems here tend toward the acerbic and emotionally cautious; and there is nothing overtly sentimental or impossibly innocent.

I’ve often heard similar things said about me. So I guess the journal is a reflection of me and my tastes. I was seriously unaware of this. I thought I was broad, open, and eclectic. It’s especially odd because I had Sarah Freligh as the guest editor. I don’t think I’d say those things about her.

Still, it’s good to hear good things about something you are dedicated to.

Much thanks go to all those who contributed to the issue:

Natalie Young, Lindsey Wallace, David Wagoner, Jerry VanIeperen, Elizabeth Twiddy, Jeff Tigchelaar, Kory M. Shrum, Michael Schmeltzer, Rebecca Givens Rolland, Mark Rice, Barbara Price, Kathryn Nuernberger, Michelle Menting, Michael McLane, Nathan McClain, Robin Linn, Gerry LaFemina, Veronica Kornberg, Nazan Koksal, Liz Kay, Christopher Howell, Gail Hosking, Sean Patrick Hill, Melanie Graham, Jeannine Hall Gailey, Chris Dollard, Jeff Dodd, Lucille Lang Day, J. P. Danicng Bear, Star Coulbrooke, Charlie Coté, Linda Cooper, Walter Bargen, guest editor Sarah Freligh, and Brian Warner for the cover art.

You can read about all of them here: http://redactions.com/contributor-bios.asp under Issue 13.

You can read the whole review of Redactions: Poetry & Poetics issue 13 here: New Pages review of Redactions issue 13.//




The Cave (Winner of The Bitter Oleander Press Library of Poetry Book Award for 2013.)

The Cave

Poems for an Empty Church

Poems for an Empty Church

The Oldest Stone in the World

The Oldest Stone in the Wolrd

Henri, Sophie, & The Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex

Henri, Sophie, & The Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex

Pre-Dew Poems

Pre-Dew Poems

Negative Time

Negative Time

After Malagueña

After Malagueña

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