Posts Tagged ‘Cardo

16
Jul
11

Redactions Issue 14 Cover

Redactions: Poetry & Poetics issue 14 is at the printer. Rather, I just received the proofs today. So now is a good time to share the cover. Below is the whole cover and the spine.

Originally, I used an I-90 sign, puffed it up, and made a gleam or shine, both of which still exist. However, that was the whole cover, aside from the words. It looked too much like Superman, so something had to be done. I decided to add a map of the United States and draw I-90 on it. That seemed to do the trick.

I also wanted to invoke a revolutionary spirit, so I drew on two great revolutions: Vorticism and the Terminator movies. You can see that in the letters, which are discussed below.

Redactions Issue 14 Cover

Below is the front cover. I’ll quote from the Editor’s Page of issue 14:

The I-90 Manifesto began in the lungs of guest editor Sean Thomas Dougherty back in October 2010. Since then, it grew into a solid movement as evidenced by the poems in this issue and by the number of times the manifesto was viewed – over 4,500 times on the Redactions: Poetry & Poetics website (www.redactions.com) and at the editor’s (Tom Holmes’) poetry and wine blog: https://thelinebreak.wordpress.com. You can also read the entire manifesto in this issue.

To help build on the revolutionary spirit of this literary movement and to show tribute to the past, I drew on one of the 20th century’s most significant movements in the arts – The Vorticists. As a result, the typeface used for the front cover and the section breaks is Grotesque No. 9, which is a very reasonable facsimile to the typeface used in theVorticists’ “great MAGENTA cover’d opusculus” – BLAST. The typeface was then altered into the Tominator style to recall another revolution started by John Connor in the Terminator movies. The Tominator style was created by Kenny Lindsay. (Thank you, Kenny.) For more information about Grotesque No. 9 see the colophon.

I had tried to make a similar style to the Tominator style and did, but whenever I flattened the image, I would lose all of the effects. Kenny, in all his genius, figured out a style that would retain the feel I was looking for. (Thank you, Kenny.)

Here’s the part of the colophon that applies to front-cover text:

The typeface used for the front cover and the section titles is Grotesque No.9. The sans serif face in Blast was the (then) new Stephenson Blake No. 9. Theface was called Grotesque by the type-founder after the many forms of sans serif font that had been produced in the Victorian era, and was unloved by the aesthete of the time due to its utilitarian appearance. The Victorian (and post-Victorian) aesthete would have chosen a serif face (like Caslon) every time. No.9 was Stephenson Blake’s own version of the genre, and it appeared about 1909. Once again, it is revealing that Blast, even in its typeface choice, is confronting orthodox tastes of its time. Such a face as this would have beenused exclusively for advertising; never for a periodical about art before the publication of Blast. However, the movement was influential, and its impacthelp shape the 20th century’s Modernist movements. For more about Grotesque No. 9, visit http://www.vorticism.co.uk/press/fonts.html, where I found all this information and more about this typeface.

Redactions Issue 14 Front Cover

The back cover may have been the most fun part. Each pin in the map represents a contributor. I used Google Maps to locate every address and stuck a pin at the location of where the person lived. The pin placements are quite accurate, except where a number of people lived, like in the Rochester, NY, area; the Erie, PA, area; and the Long-Island-Brooklyn-New-Jersey area.

For the back cover, I wanted to use a different typeface, and I didn’t want to continue the Tominator style any more, especially when the style became illegible at a smaller size. So I went with Cardo, which is what I used for the text pages. I originally wanted to use Bembo, but I couldn’t find a free or affordable version, so I used Cardo.

Here’s the part of the colophon that applies to the Cardo typeface:

“Cardo is the typeface used for the text pages and the back cover. This typeface is David J. Perry’s version of a typeface cut for the Renaissance printer Aldus Manutius and first used to print Pietro Bembo’s book De Aetna. This typeface has been revived in modern times under several names, such as Bembo, Aetna,and Aldine 401.”

Here’s more information:

It is a classic book face, suitable for scholarship, and also because it is easier to get various diacritics sized and positioned for legibility with this design than with some others. I [David J. Perry] added a set of Greek characters designed to harmonize well on the page with the Roman letters as well as many other characters useful to scholars. The Hebrew characters are designed to match those used in the Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia as closely as possible and so have no claim to originality.

To learn more about Cardo and to download the typeface, go here: http://scholarsfonts.net/cardofnt.html.

Oh, and, no that white pin above Washington state is not a mistake. There was one contributor from West Bridge, British Columbia, Canada.

Redactions Issue 14 Back Cover

If you want to order an issue of the copy, go here: http://etsy.me/ocOdpN.

This article first appeared on Behance.net account.//

06
Jun
11

Michael Meyerhofer’s Pure Elysium: Behind the Scenes

Lately, I’ve been working with Palettes & Quills in running their chapbook contest and putting together the winning chapbook – Michael Meyerhofer‘s Pure Elysium. I had so much fun doing the layout and the cover. My favorite part was . . . . Wait. Guess. . . . It was adding the colophon. I’ve always wanted to do that, and so I did.

Here’s what the colophon says:

Stencil Standard Bold, the typface appearing on the front cover, was designed in June 1937 by Robert Hunter Middleton for Ludlow Typography (a hot metal typesetting system used in letterpress printing) and one month later by Gerry Powell for the American Type Founders, which was the major type foundry in America from 1892 to the 1940s while maintaining influence into the 1960s.

Cardo is the typeface used for the text pages and the back cover. This typeface is David J. Perry’s version of a typeface cut for the Renaissance printer Aldus Manutius and first used to print Pietro Bembo’s book De Aetna. This typeface has been revived in modern times under several names, such as Bembo, Aetna, and Aldine 401.

Plus, I think I made a cool cover. The artwork is “The People Make Love” by Peter Davis. I actually  had to do some work on the cover art. The image I received was something closer to a square, but not really a square. The left, top, and bottom were mostly square, but the right side wasn’t at all. I actually had to do some Photoshop painting and cloning to the bottom right to make it square. And then I wondered what to do with a square image. I didn’t want it front and center. I wanted to do something better. Eventually, I elongated the whole image to what is here and the rest fell into place. Actually, there were quite a bunch of different color combinations. The yellow was originally red, like it is under the vase. Actually, the first cover looked like this:

Pure Elysium first cover

I think I did some cool things on the text pages, too. To find out what those things are, order a copy here.

Oh, and Michael was really cool to work with and he gave us a clean copy of his terrific manuscript. There were only two edits in the whole thing. And one was a good edit because I corrected a noun agreement and made the sounds in the correction pick up a number of more harmonies. It’s tight.

It’s a solid book of poems.

But enough about me. To the book!

//

The 2010 winner of the Palettes & Quills Second Biennial Poetry Chapbook Competition is:

Michael Meyerhofer’s Pure Elysium

Pure Elysium cover

It was selected as the winner by Dorianne Laux in December 2010. And now it has been released into the world.

It’s available at Amazon by clicking here, and it’s available for sale at Palettes & Quills by clicking here (just scroll down and click the Add to Cart button).

Here’s what they are saying about the book:

Michael Meyerhoffer’s Pure Elysium is a paradise, a sweet ride through imagination’s wide, un-mown fields. These compact and wildly various poems – funny, serious, personal, global – continually surprise and delight.     – Dorianne Laux

If this collection is Pure Elysium, then I never want to be impure again. Give me flappers with a flat tire, make my wallet turn up under a bed skirt, and let me listen to, “the sound of two hands clapping / in the vacuum between stars.” Michael Meyerhofer is the master of the twist, the patron saint of lines embodying equal parts comedy and poignancy. This collection is nothing like the knights who “woke in such a fuss / that they dressed themselves backwards,” and readers will want to wear the opposite of chainmail when reading these poems. In short, Meyerhofer has done it again. We’re lightning-struck, and it is the best kind of blessing.     – Mary Biddinger

Michael Meyerhofer’s poems reside mainly in narrative. But even though they typically begin and operate in story, they often end with an interesting lyric curl, and it is these endings that make me want to go back and reconsider their lineages. Pure Elysium’s final poem – a lyric, interestingly, which holds much to admire – declares that “we all carry the gene for greatness.” There may indeed be some of that destiny inviting us to peek at its evolution here.     – C. J. Sage

//

About Palettes and Quills:

Founded in 2002 by Donna Marbach, Palettes & Quills is devoted to the celebration and expansion of the literary and visual arts and offers both commissioned and consulting services. Palettes & Quills works to support beginning and emerging writers and artists to expand their knowledge, improve their skills, and connect to other resources in the community. Further, Palettes & Quills seeks to increase the public’s awareness and appreciation of these arts through education, advocacy, hands-on assistance, and by functioning as a literary press. For more about Palettes & Quills, visit their website: www.palettesnquills.com.//




The Cave (Winner of The Bitter Oleander Press Library of Poetry Book Award for 2013.)

The Cave

Poems for an Empty Church

Poems for an Empty Church

The Oldest Stone in the World

The Oldest Stone in the Wolrd

Henri, Sophie, & The Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex

Henri, Sophie, & The Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex

Pre-Dew Poems

Pre-Dew Poems

Negative Time

Negative Time

After Malagueña

After Malagueña

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