Posts Tagged ‘Hattiesburg

06
Apr
14

Tree Signs Along the Longleaf Trace

From about mile 1.5 to mile 3 of The Longleaf Trace, there’s a stretch where signs appear indicating various trees along The Longleaf Trace. I took a picture of each sign for curiosity, future nostalgia, and for a series of poems I’m working on. I assume there are more trees, such as the bamboo and lilac trees I have spotted but that are not marked. (I’m not good with identifying trees, but I can identify those two.) If you know of more trees along the Trace, please leave a comment thanks.

The order of these pictures are in the order as I encountered them. I walked west for the first part, so I took a picture of the tree signs on my right-hand sign, or towards the north. Then I turned around and walked east, and took pictures on my right-hand side, again, but this time to the south. The last of the north signs is, I think, “Sweetgum,” which is right at the 5K marker.

Chinese Tallow Tree

Chinese Tallow Tree

Blackgum

Blackgum

Yaupon

Yaupon

 

Sparkleberry

Sparkleberry

Post Oak

Post Oak

Shortleaf Pine

Shortleaf Pine

Sassafras

Sassafras

Tulip Poplar

Tulip Poplar

Loblolly Pine

Loblolly Pine

Longleaf Pine

Longleaf Pine

Eastern Dogwood

Eastern Dogwood

Beautyberry

Beautyberry

Elliott's Blueberry

Elliott’s Blueberry

Southern Magnolia

Southern Magnolia

Sweetgum

Sweetgum

Blackjack Oak

Blackjack Oak

Supplejack

Supplejack

Crabapple

Crabapple

Crabapple and Supplejack

Crabapple and Supplejack

Groundsel Tree

Groundsel Tree

Wax Myrtle

Wax Myrtle

Hornbeam

Hornbeam

//

The Longleaf Trace, if you don’t know, was once a railroad track, but it has been converted into a long walking and biking path. It begins at The University of Southern Mississippi campus and goes west 40.2 miles until it ends in Prentiss, Mississippi. More officially:

This is South Mississippi’s premier running, biking, hiking, equestrian trail. It is a beautiful linear park,  41 miles long and fairly flat (a rails-to-trails conversion), extending  from Hattiesburg (elevation 220′) through Sumrall (290′), Bassfield (460′), and Carson to Prentiss (336′). The trail is 10 feet wide and paved with asphalt. It has been extended to the USM campus, and negotiations are underway to acquire the right of way to downtown Hattiesburg. And can you imagine the impact of someday extending it from Prentiss to Natchez, thus connecting it to the Natchez Trace and Mississippi River Trails? (www.longleaftrace.org)

//

May 11, 2014 (Mother’s Day): I walked another mile or so along the Longleaf Trace to Jackson Road, where there’s a rest stop, too. There is also this sign, with the unfortunate typo:

Trail Identification Longleaf Trace 2008

Trail Identification Longleaf Trace 2008

There’s also another half dozen or so other trees that are labeled in the extra mile stretch. Hopefully, I’ll add them to this collection. I doubt however I’ll extend the long poem I wrote, which has a section for each tree, plus a couple others.//

25
Jul
13

Evil Penguin Lookout: The Movie

Those of you who follow me on Facebook know that since the beginning of the year or the end of 2012, and especially this summer of 2013, I post three or four times a week a picture from Longleaf Trace where it bridges over Highway 59 in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. Most of the pictures look something like this:

Highway 59

It’s just something I do on my 5K or 10K walks on the Longleaf Trace. The Longleaf Trace, if you don’t know, was once a railroad track, but it has been converted into a long walking and biking path. It begins at The University of Southern Mississippi campus and goes west 40.2 miles until it ends in Prentiss, Mississippi. More officially:

This is South Mississippi’s premier running, biking, hiking, equestrian trail. It is a beautiful linear park,  41 miles long and fairly flat (a rails-to-trails conversion), extending  from Hattiesburg (elevation 220′) through Sumrall (290′), Bassfield (460′), and Carson to Prentiss (336′). The trail is 10 feet wide and paved with asphalt. It has been extended to the USM campus, and negotiations are underway to acquire the right of way to downtown Hattiesburg. And can you imagine the impact of someday extending it from Prentiss to Natchez, thus connecting it to the Natchez Trace and Mississippi River Trails? (www.longleaftrace.org)

One night (January 4, 2013) on one of these walks, I took a picture at night.

Evil Penguin Lookout

Then the following commentary occurred:

Evil Penguin Lookout Origins_blackout

Through time it became Evil Penguin Lookout or sometimes Scary Penguin Lookout. I prefer the former but the latter is an equally acceptable name.

Today on my walk, I decided to film Evil Penguin Lookout instead of taking a picture. That way everyone can see what it looks like. I was going to provide more commentary, but there was a dude walking on the bridge and I was too self-conscious to talk too much, especially since I felt weird enough filming the bridge. So here’s Evil Penguin Lookout: The Movie, with a twist ending.

//

04
Aug
12

In Pursuit of the Juiciest Wine: Day 119 – Dynamite Cabernet Sauvignon 2008

So I’m in Hattiesburg, MS. Unfortunately, my stuff is not. United guaranteed it would be here by the 7th, but it won’t arrive until the 13th, so I have to drink wine out of this mini mason jar wine glass for nine more days.

Mini Mason Jar Wine Glass

Yay.

Dynamite Cabernet Sauvignon 2008Since I’ve so little to do, I’ll be sampling the Dynamite Cabernet Sauvignon 2008 (Red Hills Lake County).

I’ve had Dynamite before a long time ago, and I remember liking it, but my palate was young then. I’m going to try it again. Allons-y.

The color is a very deep, dark purple. It’s 99% opaque. But that might be misleading because the glass is so narrow. The meniscus, however, is a purple pink. Looking at the meniscus I anticipate that this wine has not quite reached its potential drinking age.

I’m not getting much on the nose, but I pick up some dark cherries and pepper and, maybe, some black licorice.

The finish is quick. No. Delayed. It disappears for a while and then it returns with sour black cherries. The taste buds actually recede but then blossom open to receive the next taste – a taste of black cherries and white pepper. I think I even pick up toast. (Oh, I miss my toaster.)

This is a really smooth wine. It’s pleasant. But it needs some cheese to bring out the flavors.

If I were in Brockport, I’d probably pay $10 for this, but in Hattiesburg, I paid around $16 for this. Wine here is much more expensive. I think I might have to cut down on my wine expenditures or readjust how I drink wine. I had a good system down for finding good wines under $15, but I’m going to have to raise that range to like $25 for down here. I even had some good everyday wines for $8 or $9, but down here, I’ll have no such luck.

So with that in mind. Is this wine worth $16? No. $10? Yes. Or maybe it depends on where you live.

It’s really a good wine, but it does need some food encouragement.

I’ll say 89 points.//




The Cave (Winner of The Bitter Oleander Press Library of Poetry Book Award for 2013.)

The Cave

Poems for an Empty Church

Poems for an Empty Church

The Oldest Stone in the World

The Oldest Stone in the Wolrd

Henri, Sophie, & The Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex

Henri, Sophie, & The Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex

Pre-Dew Poems

Pre-Dew Poems

Negative Time

Negative Time

After Malagueña

After Malagueña

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