Posts Tagged ‘I-90 Poetry Manifesto

16
Jul
11

Redactions Issue 14 Cover

Redactions: Poetry & Poetics issue 14 is at the printer. Rather, I just received the proofs today. So now is a good time to share the cover. Below is the whole cover and the spine.

Originally, I used an I-90 sign, puffed it up, and made a gleam or shine, both of which still exist. However, that was the whole cover, aside from the words. It looked too much like Superman, so something had to be done. I decided to add a map of the United States and draw I-90 on it. That seemed to do the trick.

I also wanted to invoke a revolutionary spirit, so I drew on two great revolutions: Vorticism and the Terminator movies. You can see that in the letters, which are discussed below.

Redactions Issue 14 Cover

Below is the front cover. I’ll quote from the Editor’s Page of issue 14:

The I-90 Manifesto began in the lungs of guest editor Sean Thomas Dougherty back in October 2010. Since then, it grew into a solid movement as evidenced by the poems in this issue and by the number of times the manifesto was viewed – over 4,500 times on the Redactions: Poetry & Poetics website (www.redactions.com) and at the editor’s (Tom Holmes’) poetry and wine blog: https://thelinebreak.wordpress.com. You can also read the entire manifesto in this issue.

To help build on the revolutionary spirit of this literary movement and to show tribute to the past, I drew on one of the 20th century’s most significant movements in the arts – The Vorticists. As a result, the typeface used for the front cover and the section breaks is Grotesque No. 9, which is a very reasonable facsimile to the typeface used in theVorticists’ “great MAGENTA cover’d opusculus” – BLAST. The typeface was then altered into the Tominator style to recall another revolution started by John Connor in the Terminator movies. The Tominator style was created by Kenny Lindsay. (Thank you, Kenny.) For more information about Grotesque No. 9 see the colophon.

I had tried to make a similar style to the Tominator style and did, but whenever I flattened the image, I would lose all of the effects. Kenny, in all his genius, figured out a style that would retain the feel I was looking for. (Thank you, Kenny.)

Here’s the part of the colophon that applies to front-cover text:

The typeface used for the front cover and the section titles is Grotesque No.9. The sans serif face in Blast was the (then) new Stephenson Blake No. 9. Theface was called Grotesque by the type-founder after the many forms of sans serif font that had been produced in the Victorian era, and was unloved by the aesthete of the time due to its utilitarian appearance. The Victorian (and post-Victorian) aesthete would have chosen a serif face (like Caslon) every time. No.9 was Stephenson Blake’s own version of the genre, and it appeared about 1909. Once again, it is revealing that Blast, even in its typeface choice, is confronting orthodox tastes of its time. Such a face as this would have beenused exclusively for advertising; never for a periodical about art before the publication of Blast. However, the movement was influential, and its impacthelp shape the 20th century’s Modernist movements. For more about Grotesque No. 9, visit http://www.vorticism.co.uk/press/fonts.html, where I found all this information and more about this typeface.

Redactions Issue 14 Front Cover

The back cover may have been the most fun part. Each pin in the map represents a contributor. I used Google Maps to locate every address and stuck a pin at the location of where the person lived. The pin placements are quite accurate, except where a number of people lived, like in the Rochester, NY, area; the Erie, PA, area; and the Long-Island-Brooklyn-New-Jersey area.

For the back cover, I wanted to use a different typeface, and I didn’t want to continue the Tominator style any more, especially when the style became illegible at a smaller size. So I went with Cardo, which is what I used for the text pages. I originally wanted to use Bembo, but I couldn’t find a free or affordable version, so I used Cardo.

Here’s the part of the colophon that applies to the Cardo typeface:

“Cardo is the typeface used for the text pages and the back cover. This typeface is David J. Perry’s version of a typeface cut for the Renaissance printer Aldus Manutius and first used to print Pietro Bembo’s book De Aetna. This typeface has been revived in modern times under several names, such as Bembo, Aetna,and Aldine 401.”

Here’s more information:

It is a classic book face, suitable for scholarship, and also because it is easier to get various diacritics sized and positioned for legibility with this design than with some others. I [David J. Perry] added a set of Greek characters designed to harmonize well on the page with the Roman letters as well as many other characters useful to scholars. The Hebrew characters are designed to match those used in the Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia as closely as possible and so have no claim to originality.

To learn more about Cardo and to download the typeface, go here: http://scholarsfonts.net/cardofnt.html.

Oh, and, no that white pin above Washington state is not a mistake. There was one contributor from West Bridge, British Columbia, Canada.

Redactions Issue 14 Back Cover

If you want to order an issue of the copy, go here: http://etsy.me/ocOdpN.

This article first appeared on Behance.net account.//

15
Jul
11

The I-90 Poetry Revolution Begins 9-3-11

The second most important date in the history of American poetry is September 3, 2011, at 7:30 p.m. This is when poets from all over the country will gather at A Different Path Gallery to read poems announcing and supporting the I-90 Poetry Manifesto. (You can read the manifesto here  or as PDF here.)

The I-90 Revolution Reading Poster

Besides reading the poems that will be heard ’round the world, it will be the release party of Redactions: Poetry & Poetics issue 14.

Redactions Issue 14 front cover(Special thanks to Kenny Lindsay for his help on the Tominator style for the letters.)

The final list of readers isn’t complete, but all the poets in issue 14 have been invited, including:

Corey Zeller, William Wright, Joe Wilkins, Antonio Vallone, Bill Tremblay, Daniel Tobin, Claudia M. Stanek, Matt Smythe, Martha Silano, Gregory Sherl, Ravi Shankar, Edwina Seaver, Wanda Schubmehl, Karen Schubert, John Roche, Michael Robins, Joseph Rathgeber, Nate Pritts, Derek Pollard, Dan Pinkerton, Eric Neuenfeldt, Laura E. J. Moran, Lindsay Miller, Philip Metres, Laura McCullough, Djelloul Marbrook, Gerry LaFemina, Keetje Kuipers, Les Kay, Kitty Jospe, Jonathan Johnson, Gwendolyn Cash James, Adam Houle, William Heyen, Andrei Guruianu, Richard Foerster, Jonathan Farmer, Deirdre Dore, Laura E. Davis, Jim Daniels, Charles Cote, Peter Conners, Holly Virginia Clark, Alex Cigale, Jan Wenk Cedras, Rob Carney, James Capozzi, John Bradley, Tricia Asklar, Sherman Alexie, Lisa Akus, and guest editor Sean Thomas Dougherty.

Don’t miss it. As Sean Thomas Dougherty says, “There will be poetry so beautiful it will change your life.”

A Different Path Gallery is located at 27 Market Street in Brockport, NY.

The event is free, but bring a bottle of wine if you can.

If you’re on Facebook, you can add it to your calendar here: I-90 Poetry Revolution Facebook page.

If you want a PDF of the poster, click The I-90 Revolution Reading Poster PDF.

26
Apr
11

in pursuit of the juiciest wine: day ninety-one (Signargues Côtes du Rhônes Villages Granacha 2007)

Man, the poetry world is busy lately. I’ve been running the Just Poets blog updating it with all the local poetry events and posting a poem day for National Poetry Month. I’ve been laying out and doing the cover for Michael Meyerhofer‘s Pure Elysium, which won the Palettes & Quills 2010 chapbook contest as judged by Dorianne Laux. (Her latest collection, The Book of Men, is wonderful. Look for a review here soon.) Here’s the Pure Elysium cover:

Pure Elysium full cover

I’m also just about to start editing issue 14 of Redactions: Poetry & Poetics – the I-90 Poetry Manifesto issue with guest editor Sean Thomas Dougherty. (There’s a good interview with him at Bookslut.) Then I have an anthology to layout and do the cover for. Plus, I gotta work my full-time job, too. Oh, and I’m planning the last reading of the season for the A Different Path Gallery Reading Series. You can read about the last reading of the season here.

Man, do I need a drink.

Tonight, I’m going to have Signargues Côtes du Rhônes Villages Granacha 2007. A Granacha from the Rhone valley. Robert Parker at the Wine Advocate gave it 91 points. So it will probably be a big, fruity wine with lots of alcohol. Bonus – It’s an old vine wine. Sweet.

I’ve been dying to drink this for about two weeks, so here it goes.

It shimmers in ruby like thick stained glass windows that have never been clean and the sun is setting so its low angles of sunlight barely light it and create the hint of a glow.

The nose is pleasant with some bright berries, dark raspberries, and flowers. And there’s a hint of duck.

My first sip is Yum and It will go good with cheese. I pictured a yellowy orange cheese. (Grammar rule: don’t hyphenate compound modifiers if the word ends with a y.)

When I taste the Granacha, I pick up the duck again. I also get some big, dark berries. The finish is a bit spicy, too. This wine is almost meaty, too. I feel like I can almost eat it. Or maybe I just want to. Oh, to eat a wine. That would be divine. (Or should I say, devine. Ha.)

The body doesn’t give much. It’s like it wants to let loose and be juicy, but it’s being anal about something. Maybe it needs more time to open, though it’s been over an hour. Maybe it needs a decanter. Maybe it needs tomorrow. Don’t we all need tomorrow. As long as tomorrow arrives with me, all is good.

I don’t have much else to say about this wine. I hope I didn’t pay more than $15 for it.

. . .

So I’ve been swirling the glass around for the last half hour, and it’s opening. The berries are definitely brighter. There’s less dank.

The DankMoe: Oh, everybody is going to family restaurants these days, tsk. Seems nobody wants to hang out in a dank pit no more.
Carl: You ain’t thinking of getting rid of the dank, are you, Moe?
Moe: Ehh, maybe I am.
Carl: Oh, but Moe: the dank. The dank!

I like less dank, and this wine is slowly getting better. It’s lively and almost jammy. A thin jammy.

It’s such a different wine in the last half hour.

I’m digging it.

I’m giving it an A-. I love it.//

06
Sep
10

I-90 Manifesto

 

I-90 Manifesto

.

I-90 Revolution

Like the highway which we live on, we embrace the bicoastal and the local but disdain coastal pretensions and inland parochialisms.

We disdain cosmopolitan elitisms and rural anti-intellectualism.

We embrace the idea of wanting to be elsewhere while at the same time loving where we are.

We embrace the exploratory and the formal but never at the expense of each other.

We disdain intellectualism that loses the human. The human must come first.

We embrace the heart and the gut and believe all truly great art emerges from the body.

The body is the place of the only universals.

We believe in greatness of the natural, the great lakes and the mountains, the big sky.

We believe in toughness like the factory workers, the immigrants, and the indigenous peoples that guard our rails.

We sing the northern hemisphere and the four seasons.

We sing the salmon and the seal. We sing the mountain lion and the ram’s ghost.

We sing the empty factory husks and shadows of lost limbs.

We sing with images and music.

We believe Poetry can truly make a difference in the lives of those who need it, but too often it does not.

We believe this is the fault of both Poetry and The System.

We believe that too often Poetry has deluded itself as revolutionary only to become more obfuscating than the system.

We believe Poetry must be part of the great struggle for human dignity.

We believe a poem is not a bullet or a plaything. It is not a pastime or something that is “appreciated.”

We believe in readers. A poem is written to be read.

Sean Thomas Dougherty (Guest Editor) and Tom Holmes (Editor)
Redactions: Poetry & Poetics

If you believe, if you want to join the I-90 Revolution, put your poetry submissions into one attached document or paste into the body of an email and send to redactionspoetry(at)yahoo.com. (Replace “(at)” with “@”.) Also, if you live within 50 miles of I-90, please indicate that in your submission.

Please, no poems about I-90, highways, or roads.

For more information: http://redactions.com/I-90_Manifesto.pdf

You may also submit poems not related to the I-90 Poetry Revolution following the above submission guidelines.

TELL YOUR FRIENDS. TELL YOUR NEIGHBORS. BUT DON’T TELL THE COPS.//




The Cave (Winner of The Bitter Oleander Press Library of Poetry Book Award for 2013.)

The Cave

Poems for an Empty Church

Poems for an Empty Church

The Oldest Stone in the World

The Oldest Stone in the Wolrd

Henri, Sophie, & The Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex

Henri, Sophie, & The Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex

Pre-Dew Poems

Pre-Dew Poems

Negative Time

Negative Time

After Malagueña

After Malagueña

Enter your email address to subscribe to The Line Break and receive email notifications of new posts.

Join 2,493 other followers

November 2019
M T W T F S S
« Jul    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930  

Archives

The Line Break Tweets


%d bloggers like this: