Posts Tagged ‘Lucille Lang Day

17
Feb
13

Lucille Lang Day’s The Curvature of Blue (2009)

Over the next few weeks or months, I will post all my reviews (“Tom’s Celebrations”) that appeared in Redactions: Poetry, Poetics, & Prose (formerly Redactions: Poetry & Poetics) up to and including issue 12. After that, my reviews appeared here (The Line Break) before appearing in the journal. This review first appeared in issue 12, which was published circa November 2009.

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Lucille Lang Day – The Curvature of BlueThe following interview may or may not have occurred with Lucille Lang Day on Tuesday, May 12. I was inspired to interview her after reading her most recent collection of poems, The Curvature of Blue (Cervena Barva Press). I was especially drawn to her book because of the cosmological poems. They are some of the finest ones written. And if you enjoy science, cosmology, physics, color, love, death, and poetry, you’ll enjoy this book.

Tom Holmes: I’m here with Lucille Lang Day, a poet I’ve been meaning to read for a while. Since I and others may be new to you, I first want to know if you could briefly describe yourself to me and the readers?

Lucille Lang Day: I will defer to the book and let it speak for itself.

TH: Okay. So, The Curvature of Blue, could you describe yourself?

The Curvature of Blue: “There’s no one quite / like me” (p 13).

TH: I’m sure that is true, but could you be a bit more specific, please?

TCOB: “I am one / with bees and ants creating // their chambers” (p 24).

TH: Okay, and what can the reader expect from you?

TCOB: The reader will “hear cinnabar / olive, raw umber, magenta, / violet and chartreuse / mingling in counterpoint” (p 19).

TH: That’s fine. I noticed the patience of your poems. They seem at ease. Would you agree? How would describe the momentum?

TCOB: Yes. It’s like when “Rain sifts down like fine flour” (p 8).

TH: I also noticed an evolution as the book moved forward. It’s almost sequential . . .

TCOB: Oh, I couldn’t disagree more.
“Moments are shuffled and reshuffled
to give the illusion of time and history.
Everything happens at once and forever” (p 34).

TH: So, you are atemporal. That’s a very interesting way to create. Could you describe your creative process?

TCOB: Well, it’s a bit like
“The one sperm that enters,
cells cleaving to form
a hollow ball, bouncing
down the oviduct, the infolding
and implanting in the muscular
wall of my uterus, the welldeveloped
tail, pharyngeal gills
just like those of a fish
forming before finger buds,
heart and brain, the long
months of turning and turning
like a vase on a potter’s wheel,
the finished child sliding,
wet and shining,
into her father’s palms.” (p 14)

TH: Awesome. Now, is that what it’s like when you actually write the poem, too?

TCOB: No, when I write, it’s more like there is something
“stirring inside me, walking
the long corridors of my brain,
searching for something
irretrievable, precious, still there.” (p 38)

TH: So, why do you write?

TCOB: “To waken the angels” (p 54).

TH: That reminds me, death seems important to you. How would you describe death?

TCOB: “When the end draws near,
light descends, thunder roars,
and all of heaven enters
the body through a slender
glass column. The brain lights
up as galaxies spin, planets
of every imaginable color
turn in their orbits, and
billions of moons, stony
or gaseous, glow inside
the cerebrum. In that
instant you finally know
the meaning of it all.
Then one by one the stars
blink out, constellations
disappear, and you
are a barren cave.” (p 55)

TH: I like that. It seems we only have time for two more questions. The penultimate question, what caused the curvature of blue?

TCOB: “[. . .] the moon
circling earth, dragging
the oceans like flowing
blue gowns; the human
heart pumping blood
through a network of rivers” (p 68).

TH: Nice. And one last question. Do you have any advice for the young writers?

TCOB: “To be an artist, you must be crazy” (p 28).

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Day, Lucille Lang. The Curvature of Blue. West Somerville, MA: Cervena Barva Press, 2009.//

15
May
11

Another Review of Redactions Issue 13

Redactions is a living pulsing entity that enthusiastically embraces its mission.

The Review Review and one of its editors, Jenny Moore, sure had a good time with Redactions: Poetry & Poetics issue 13.

The Review Review

The review begins:

It’s all poetry all the time in Redactions, coming out of Brockport, New York every nine months. The journal doesn’t stop at printing a smorgasbord of poems; a solid third of its pages are devoted to poetry reviews and essays on poetry. Altogether it’s a well-curated package . . . . Editor Tom Holmes is clearly devoted to his journal, which has been around for at least nine years, and Redactions charmed me quickly.

I like the last sentence best because it’s insightful and true . . . I am devoted.

The review continues to say good things about the poems and pointed out some specific poems, like Lucille Lang Day’s “Journeys,” Star Coulbrooke’s “Sky’s the Limit,” and Veronica Kornberg’s “Five Mothers Consider Cunt” (“a sentimental favorite” for Moore.)

And then Moore got to the Poetics section of the journal, and said this:

When I moved into the reviews and essays that make up the last third of the journal, I had concerns that the prose might be intimidating or soporific – but these fears were short-lived. The prose was informal, insightful, and opinionated. Reading some of the pieces felt more like talking with a poet who reads and thinks about poetry than it did to reading yet another academic essay or analytical review.

Redactions Issue 13 CoverAgain, I like the last sentence, and I’m glad she picked up on that because that’s what I strive for when I write my reviews and hope those that review books for Redactions do the same. So success.

And the review even said some fine things about the cover.

So that’s another favorable review for Redactions: Poetry & Poetics issue 13. It’s success couldn’t have been had without all the poets who contributed and guest editor Sarah Freligh.

Thank you Jenny Moore and The Review Review for such a good read of the journal.//

15
Feb
11

Redactions Issue 13 Review

Today New Pages released a review of Redactions: Poetry & Poetics issue 13.

New Pages

Redactions Issue 13 CoverNew Pages is a very informative website that is concerned with literature, especially presses and journals. Each month or so they write reviews of a few selected literary journals. They are always reviewing something or posting news about something literary. Today they reviewed the poetry journal I edit, Redactions.

At one point they say:

If you’re looking for smart new poems, you’ll know you’re there when you pick up this issue of Redactions.

They also mention some of the poets in the issue, such as David Wagoner, J.P. Dancing Bear, Gerry LaFemina, Jeanine Hall Gailey, Walter Bargen, Michael Schmeltzer, Nathan McClain, Kathryn Nuernberger, Linda Cooper, and Lucille Lang Day.

The review also says this about the journal:

There is nothing crass or excessively edgy, though poems here tend toward the acerbic and emotionally cautious; and there is nothing overtly sentimental or impossibly innocent.

I’ve often heard similar things said about me. So I guess the journal is a reflection of me and my tastes. I was seriously unaware of this. I thought I was broad, open, and eclectic. It’s especially odd because I had Sarah Freligh as the guest editor. I don’t think I’d say those things about her.

Still, it’s good to hear good things about something you are dedicated to.

Much thanks go to all those who contributed to the issue:

Natalie Young, Lindsey Wallace, David Wagoner, Jerry VanIeperen, Elizabeth Twiddy, Jeff Tigchelaar, Kory M. Shrum, Michael Schmeltzer, Rebecca Givens Rolland, Mark Rice, Barbara Price, Kathryn Nuernberger, Michelle Menting, Michael McLane, Nathan McClain, Robin Linn, Gerry LaFemina, Veronica Kornberg, Nazan Koksal, Liz Kay, Christopher Howell, Gail Hosking, Sean Patrick Hill, Melanie Graham, Jeannine Hall Gailey, Chris Dollard, Jeff Dodd, Lucille Lang Day, J. P. Danicng Bear, Star Coulbrooke, Charlie Coté, Linda Cooper, Walter Bargen, guest editor Sarah Freligh, and Brian Warner for the cover art.

You can read about all of them here: http://redactions.com/contributor-bios.asp under Issue 13.

You can read the whole review of Redactions: Poetry & Poetics issue 13 here: New Pages review of Redactions issue 13.//




The Cave (Winner of The Bitter Oleander Press Library of Poetry Book Award for 2013.)

The Cave

Poems for an Empty Church

Poems for an Empty Church

The Oldest Stone in the World

The Oldest Stone in the Wolrd

Henri, Sophie, & The Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex

Henri, Sophie, & The Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex

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Pre-Dew Poems

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After Malagueña

After Malagueña

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