Posts Tagged ‘Michael Meyerhofer

14
Jun
14

Word Clouds and Sestina Writing Prompt

I am working on a full-length manuscript of poems currently titled Accumulation on the Door Hinge. In this collection, I use “orange,” the fruit or the color, as an accumulative objective correlative for my emotional and psychic state. You can read more about it here in Michael Meyerhofer’s interview with me (http://atticusreview.org/flinty-lyricism-an-interview-with-tom-holmes/) at Atticus Review.

I decided to make a word cloud out of the words in the manuscript, so far, just to see what’s going on. I had to make three of them at Wordle because I needed some form of accuracy since “orange” is in most of the poems and there is an eight-page poem that repeats “even now” every fifth line. So I needed versions without those words.

In the process of doing this, I thought up a writing exercise or writing prompt. The six most frequently occurring words in the manuscript can be used as the end words in a sestina. (Or maybe you can use the six least frequently occurring words.) Anyway, this is an easy and meaningful way to pick the end words. I might not use the six most frequent words, but I’m sure I’ll use six from the top ten. Also, the bigger the word in the cloud, the more often it appears in the text, and the smallest words occur the least. For whatever reason, the cloud considers contractions, such as “ll” or “ve” as in “I’ll” or “we’ve,” as words, but those can be dismissed.

So here’s a word cloud with all of the words in my manuscript. Note: there is “Orange” with a capital “O” and “orange” with a lower case “o.” “Orange” occurs 80 times in the 54-page manuscript.

The Door Hinge Word Cloud (all words)Here’s a word cloud that keeps all the occurrences of “orange” but removes the “even now” occurrences from the text.

The Door Hinge Word Cloud (no Even Now)

And here’s a word cloud of the manuscript with no occurrences of “orange” or “even now” in the text.

The Door Hinge Word Cloud (no orange or even now)Apparently, I have a lot of similes in manuscript 🙂

Anyway, you should give this a try with your manuscript. There are plenty of word cloud generators out there. I chose Wordle because it has multiple cloud shapes.//

 

 

01
Jan
12

Best Poetry Books in 2011

According to No Tell Poetry and Michael Meyerhofer, my poetry book, Poems for an Empty Church (Palettes & Quills)was one of the best poetry books released in 2011. You can read the full list here: http://notellpoetry.blogspot.com/2011/12/best-poetry-books-of-2011-michael.html.

Poems for an Empty Church front cover

Why not order a copy now?! Just click here.//

06
Jun
11

Michael Meyerhofer’s Pure Elysium: Behind the Scenes

Lately, I’ve been working with Palettes & Quills in running their chapbook contest and putting together the winning chapbook – Michael Meyerhofer‘s Pure Elysium. I had so much fun doing the layout and the cover. My favorite part was . . . . Wait. Guess. . . . It was adding the colophon. I’ve always wanted to do that, and so I did.

Here’s what the colophon says:

Stencil Standard Bold, the typface appearing on the front cover, was designed in June 1937 by Robert Hunter Middleton for Ludlow Typography (a hot metal typesetting system used in letterpress printing) and one month later by Gerry Powell for the American Type Founders, which was the major type foundry in America from 1892 to the 1940s while maintaining influence into the 1960s.

Cardo is the typeface used for the text pages and the back cover. This typeface is David J. Perry’s version of a typeface cut for the Renaissance printer Aldus Manutius and first used to print Pietro Bembo’s book De Aetna. This typeface has been revived in modern times under several names, such as Bembo, Aetna, and Aldine 401.

Plus, I think I made a cool cover. The artwork is “The People Make Love” by Peter Davis. I actually  had to do some work on the cover art. The image I received was something closer to a square, but not really a square. The left, top, and bottom were mostly square, but the right side wasn’t at all. I actually had to do some Photoshop painting and cloning to the bottom right to make it square. And then I wondered what to do with a square image. I didn’t want it front and center. I wanted to do something better. Eventually, I elongated the whole image to what is here and the rest fell into place. Actually, there were quite a bunch of different color combinations. The yellow was originally red, like it is under the vase. Actually, the first cover looked like this:

Pure Elysium first cover

I think I did some cool things on the text pages, too. To find out what those things are, order a copy here.

Oh, and Michael was really cool to work with and he gave us a clean copy of his terrific manuscript. There were only two edits in the whole thing. And one was a good edit because I corrected a noun agreement and made the sounds in the correction pick up a number of more harmonies. It’s tight.

It’s a solid book of poems.

But enough about me. To the book!

//

The 2010 winner of the Palettes & Quills Second Biennial Poetry Chapbook Competition is:

Michael Meyerhofer’s Pure Elysium

Pure Elysium cover

It was selected as the winner by Dorianne Laux in December 2010. And now it has been released into the world.

It’s available at Amazon by clicking here, and it’s available for sale at Palettes & Quills by clicking here (just scroll down and click the Add to Cart button).

Here’s what they are saying about the book:

Michael Meyerhoffer’s Pure Elysium is a paradise, a sweet ride through imagination’s wide, un-mown fields. These compact and wildly various poems – funny, serious, personal, global – continually surprise and delight.     – Dorianne Laux

If this collection is Pure Elysium, then I never want to be impure again. Give me flappers with a flat tire, make my wallet turn up under a bed skirt, and let me listen to, “the sound of two hands clapping / in the vacuum between stars.” Michael Meyerhofer is the master of the twist, the patron saint of lines embodying equal parts comedy and poignancy. This collection is nothing like the knights who “woke in such a fuss / that they dressed themselves backwards,” and readers will want to wear the opposite of chainmail when reading these poems. In short, Meyerhofer has done it again. We’re lightning-struck, and it is the best kind of blessing.     – Mary Biddinger

Michael Meyerhofer’s poems reside mainly in narrative. But even though they typically begin and operate in story, they often end with an interesting lyric curl, and it is these endings that make me want to go back and reconsider their lineages. Pure Elysium’s final poem – a lyric, interestingly, which holds much to admire – declares that “we all carry the gene for greatness.” There may indeed be some of that destiny inviting us to peek at its evolution here.     – C. J. Sage

//

About Palettes and Quills:

Founded in 2002 by Donna Marbach, Palettes & Quills is devoted to the celebration and expansion of the literary and visual arts and offers both commissioned and consulting services. Palettes & Quills works to support beginning and emerging writers and artists to expand their knowledge, improve their skills, and connect to other resources in the community. Further, Palettes & Quills seeks to increase the public’s awareness and appreciation of these arts through education, advocacy, hands-on assistance, and by functioning as a literary press. For more about Palettes & Quills, visit their website: www.palettesnquills.com.//

26
Apr
11

in pursuit of the juiciest wine: day ninety-one (Signargues Côtes du Rhônes Villages Granacha 2007)

Man, the poetry world is busy lately. I’ve been running the Just Poets blog updating it with all the local poetry events and posting a poem day for National Poetry Month. I’ve been laying out and doing the cover for Michael Meyerhofer‘s Pure Elysium, which won the Palettes & Quills 2010 chapbook contest as judged by Dorianne Laux. (Her latest collection, The Book of Men, is wonderful. Look for a review here soon.) Here’s the Pure Elysium cover:

Pure Elysium full cover

I’m also just about to start editing issue 14 of Redactions: Poetry & Poetics – the I-90 Poetry Manifesto issue with guest editor Sean Thomas Dougherty. (There’s a good interview with him at Bookslut.) Then I have an anthology to layout and do the cover for. Plus, I gotta work my full-time job, too. Oh, and I’m planning the last reading of the season for the A Different Path Gallery Reading Series. You can read about the last reading of the season here.

Man, do I need a drink.

Tonight, I’m going to have Signargues Côtes du Rhônes Villages Granacha 2007. A Granacha from the Rhone valley. Robert Parker at the Wine Advocate gave it 91 points. So it will probably be a big, fruity wine with lots of alcohol. Bonus – It’s an old vine wine. Sweet.

I’ve been dying to drink this for about two weeks, so here it goes.

It shimmers in ruby like thick stained glass windows that have never been clean and the sun is setting so its low angles of sunlight barely light it and create the hint of a glow.

The nose is pleasant with some bright berries, dark raspberries, and flowers. And there’s a hint of duck.

My first sip is Yum and It will go good with cheese. I pictured a yellowy orange cheese. (Grammar rule: don’t hyphenate compound modifiers if the word ends with a y.)

When I taste the Granacha, I pick up the duck again. I also get some big, dark berries. The finish is a bit spicy, too. This wine is almost meaty, too. I feel like I can almost eat it. Or maybe I just want to. Oh, to eat a wine. That would be divine. (Or should I say, devine. Ha.)

The body doesn’t give much. It’s like it wants to let loose and be juicy, but it’s being anal about something. Maybe it needs more time to open, though it’s been over an hour. Maybe it needs a decanter. Maybe it needs tomorrow. Don’t we all need tomorrow. As long as tomorrow arrives with me, all is good.

I don’t have much else to say about this wine. I hope I didn’t pay more than $15 for it.

. . .

So I’ve been swirling the glass around for the last half hour, and it’s opening. The berries are definitely brighter. There’s less dank.

The DankMoe: Oh, everybody is going to family restaurants these days, tsk. Seems nobody wants to hang out in a dank pit no more.
Carl: You ain’t thinking of getting rid of the dank, are you, Moe?
Moe: Ehh, maybe I am.
Carl: Oh, but Moe: the dank. The dank!

I like less dank, and this wine is slowly getting better. It’s lively and almost jammy. A thin jammy.

It’s such a different wine in the last half hour.

I’m digging it.

I’m giving it an A-. I love it.//




The Cave (Winner of The Bitter Oleander Press Library of Poetry Book Award for 2013.)

The Cave

Poems for an Empty Church

Poems for an Empty Church

The Oldest Stone in the World

The Oldest Stone in the Wolrd

Henri, Sophie, & The Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex

Henri, Sophie, & The Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex

Pre-Dew Poems

Pre-Dew Poems

Negative Time

Negative Time

After Malagueña

After Malagueña

Enter your email address to subscribe to The Line Break and receive email notifications of new posts.

Join 2,493 other followers

November 2019
M T W T F S S
« Jul    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930  

Archives

The Line Break Tweets


%d bloggers like this: