Posts Tagged ‘poetry reading

01
Feb
12

Footage from Rob Carney’s Brockport Reading (1-28-12)

On Saturday, January 28 at A Different Path Gallery, Brockport, NY, and really all of New York were introduced to the presence and voice of Rob Carney for the first time. It was a fun reading, and here’s the beginning of the reading.

Rob Carney is the author of number of books, including Story Problems (Somondoco Press, 2011),  Weather Report (Somondoco P, 2006) and Boasts, Toasts, and Ghosts (Pinyon Press, 2003), winner of the Pinyon Press National Poetry Book Award — and two chapbooks, New Fables, Old Songs (Dream Horse Press, 2003) and This Is One Sexy Planet (Frank Cat Press, 2005). His work has appeared in Mid-American Review, Quarterly West, and dozens of other journals, as well as Flash Fiction Forward (W. W. Norton, 2006). He lives in Salt Lake City. To hear an interview with him, the Poet Laureate of Utah, Katharine Coles, and the editor at Sugar House Review, John Kippen, click here. He is also a former guest editor of Redactions: Poetry & Poetics.

29
Sep
11

Poems for an Empty Church Book Release Reading and Party

Oh yeah. October is just around the corner, and you know what that means, don’t you? Yup. My girlfriend celebrates her birthday. And it’s time to celebrate Ezra Pound’s birthday.

Ezra Pound Yawping

And the Yankees make the playoffs. And it’s Halloween. And Tom Holmes has a book-release reading and party.

Poems for an Empty Church front cover

That’s right. I’ll be reading at A Different Path Gallery on Saturday, October 22 at 7:30 p.m. at the wonderful art gallery in downtown Brockport, A Different Path Gallery, located at 27 Market Street.

Poems for an Empty Church poster

[To download a printable version of the poster, click Poems for an Empty Church PDF.]

Oh yeah. Good times. Poetry, wine, food, and you. Come for the wine. Stay for the poetry.

Here’s what they are saying about the book:

I’ve had a good time with Poems for an Empty Church, which is a big book, capacious, and surprised me with its often free-flowing and associational aesthetics.  As you want (usually) a cubist perspective(s), and as you say you want your poem/accept your poem as smarter than you are, you hit all sorts of interesting effects.  So, friend, way to go. I peered through the rocks into that eye & land of yours ….

– William Heyen, author of Shoah Train (finalist for the National Book Award)

Of course, no church is ever really empty unless people let ritual and myth lapse into repetition and dogma. Even then it isn’t empty, just empty of awe. That’s when origin stories are most necessary, and that’s what Tom Holmes provides in abundance: Moons create amazement, then stones create reflection, then people come along creating words, aggression, fire, flutes, art, physics, and probably our destruction, everything progressing ’til it returns full circle. Along the way, “statues pry themselves from sides of buildings / and exit the city / clutching their plaques.” Along the way, a lot of fine poems unfold, one containing a curse: “you have succeeded / in being only what you thought / you should be.” It’s a curse because we ought to be more. In a century in need of a giant do-over, Poems for an Empty Church reminds us of that. Even better, it makes a good lever or spark.

– Rob Carney, author of Story ProblemsWeather Report, and Boasts, Toasts, and Ghosts

In Poems for an Empty Church, Tom Holmes writes of birth and death and the life we live in between those two events in beautifully sculpted lines carved into the white space that surrounds them. “I dare say I can hear / muddy angels singing /the lines of God,” he writes in “The Calculus of a Tod Marshall Book of Poems.” There are plenty of angels in Tom Holmes’ poems too, but one must be still enough to hear and appreciate the whisk of wings hovering over these powerful meditations.

– Sarah Freligh, author of Sort of Gone

I think of Charles Olsen when I read Tom Holmes’ poems: open, investigative, prophetic, often with mystical implications. These are the elements of our best modernist poems, and Holmes is a modernist – or a pre-modernist, or a post-pre-modernist. And there lies the real interesting part of his poems, they are hard to fit into anyone anywhere. He sits us in an empty church and says listen. He knows “it was the moons talked first.” He knows the dreams we dream even when “we wheeze / asleep in our boxes of shadows.” In these poems and parables is our collective of fire and nightfall, origins and endings, monochromatics, rivers, and stretch marks. Sappho makes a rare presence, but this is a book more stone-carved than page-written and she too is an ancient muse. As this author’s I is an absent eye, scanning the world of caves and shadows to find clouds who feed themselves, ghosts like alphabets, and men who whittle bones into flutes.

– Sean Thomas Dougherty, author of Sasha Sings the Laundry on the Line and Broken Hallelujahs

Poems for an Empty Church was officially released September 2, 2011, from Palettes & Quills. Founded in 2002, Palettes & Quills is devoted to the celebration and expansion of the literary and visual arts and offers both commissioned and consulting services. Palettes & Quills works to support beginning and emerging writers and artists to expand their knowledge, improve their skills, and connect to other resources in the community. Further, Palettes & Quills seeks to increase the public’s awareness and appreciation of these arts through education, advocacy, hands-on assistance, and by functioning as a literary press.//

20
Apr
11

A Different Path Gallery Reading Series: May 2011

On Saturday, May 21 at 7:30 p.m. at A Different Path Gallery (27 Market St., Brockport, NY), John Roche and Kitty Jospé will read their poetry.

Roche Jospé Poetry Reading Poster

Kitty Jospé – Teacher with a passion for languages and the arts. Music and poetry both require a precision in elements of craft applied to the endless possibilities of personality.  This line from her poem, “Rumbled in the Street,” sums up her ars poetica: “I want to land a helicopter – stop the massacre of what it means to be human.” Her book, Cadences, will be available. Proceeds go to Women Helping Girls.

John Roche  earned his PhD from SUNY Buffalo, studying with Robert Creeley and John C. Clarke. His first two full-length poetry collections are Topicalities (2008) and On Conesus (2005), both from FootHills Publishing. His latest book of poems, Road Ghosts, is available from theenk Books. He also edited the collection Uncensored Songs for Sam Abrams (Spuyten Duyvil, 2008), co-edited with Patricia Roth Schwartz an anthology of poetry by inmates at Auburn Prison called Doing Time to Cleanse My Mind (FootHills, 2009), and edited Martha Rittenhouse Treichler’s Black Mountain to Crooked Lake: Poems 1948-2010, with a Memoir of Black Mountain College (FootHills, 2010). Roche is an Associate Professor of English at RIT.

To download a printable post, click Roche Jospé Poetry Reading Poster PDF.

Schedule it on your Facebook calendar by clicking here.//

27
Feb
11

Three Bad-Ass Poets Reading

Poets shouldn’t jingle jangle jingle. They should be tough like cowboys.

No. Tougher than that.

They should be rough as sandpaper and tough as nails. They should be:

Three Bad-Ass Poets Reading Poster

Who are these Bad-Ass Poets?

The Doc (Charles Coté) is the author of the chapbook Flying for the Window (Finishing Line Press, 2008) and is working on a full-length book of persona poems called Shrink, which is  about a man in search of himself amidst the patients he tries to help. Publication credits include: Upstreet, Salamander, The Cortland Review, Redactions, Free Lunch, Identity Theory, Blueline, Modern Haiku, Connecticut River Review, and HazMat Review. He is a psychotherapist in private practice and teaches poetry at Writers & Books in Rochester, NY.

The Babe (Sarah Freligh) is the author of Sort of Gone (WordTech Communications, 2008), a book of poems that follows the rise and fall of a fictional pitcher named Al Stepansky. Her work has been featured on Garrison Keillor’s Writer’s Almanac and in the upcoming anthology Good Poems: American Places. Among her awards are a 2009 poetry fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, a poetry grant from the Constance Saltonstall Foundation in 2006, and a grant from the New York State Council for the Arts in 1997. Sarah was born and raised in Michigan, and she currently teaches at St. John Fisher College in Rochester, New York.

The Wino (Tom Holmes) is the editor of Redactions: Poetry & Poetics (www.redactions.com). He is also author of After Malagueña (FootHills Publishing, 2005), Negative Time (Pudding House, 2007), Pre-Dew Poems (FootHills Publishing, 2008), Henri, Sophie, & the Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex (BlazeVOX Books, 2009), The Oldest Stone in the World (Amsterdam Press, 2011), and Poetry Assignments: The Book (Sage Hill Press, forthcoming 2011). He has thrice been nominated for the Pushcart Prize. His work has appeared on Verse Daily and has also appeared in Blue Earth Review, Chiron Review, Crab Creek Review, The Delmarva Review, The G. W. Review, Mississippi Review, Mid-American Review, New Delta Review, New Zoo Poetry Review, Orange Coast Review, Rockhurst Review, San Pedro River Review, Santa Clara Review, South Carolina Review, Sugar House Review, Swarthmore Review, and many other journals that don’t have “Review” in their name. He also maintains this blog and makes posters.

For more information about A Different Path Gallery and their other events, visit their website: http://www.differentpathgallery.com/.

To download the poster as a PDF, click Three Bad-Ass Poets Reading Poster PDF.//




The Cave (Winner of The Bitter Oleander Press Library of Poetry Book Award for 2013.)

The Cave

Poems for an Empty Church

Poems for an Empty Church

The Oldest Stone in the World

The Oldest Stone in the Wolrd

Henri, Sophie, & The Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex

Henri, Sophie, & The Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound: Poems Blasted from the Vortex

Pre-Dew Poems

Pre-Dew Poems

Negative Time

Negative Time

After Malagueña

After Malagueña

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